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Here’s why seafood is an important of the training regiment of Gold medalist Kikkan Randall

Congratulations to 5-time Olympian and Alaskan Kikkan Randall from the U.S. Cross-Country Skiing team that won the Gold medal in the team sprint at the PyeongChang Olympic Games.

In this video from Alaska Seafood, Kikkan talks about how Alaska Seafood “feeds her fitness.” Wild Alaska Seafood is a lean, high-quality protein. Eating Alaska Seafood was part of Kikkan’s training regimen while pregnant. The DHA, an Omega-3 fatty acid plentiful in Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon, is essential for the nervous system and brain development in babies.

A high-quality lean protein source is important for all kinds of athletes. Whether you’re running in the local 5k or training for the next Olympics, there is no purer, more natural source of protein than wild seafood. Lean but dense with nutrients at the same time, seafood is a perfect protein for athletes.

Achieving peak form is a goal for all of us, whether we’re pro, amateur, or not even practicing athletes. And seafood should be part of all of our diets. Wild Alaska Seafood has such an expansive nutrient profile that meets most of the important physiological demands of an athlete in training.

Wild Alaska Seafood helps athletes…

Recover faster

Convert protein and sugar to energy as an excellent source of vitamins B6 and B12

Augment blood flow

Reduce swelling

Maximize fat loss by lowering triglycerides

Develop focus and mind function

Maintain strong and healthy bones with its exceptionally high vitamin D content

Optimize aerobic capacity

Expand lung performance

Improve joint health

Be Happier

Here’s another huge secret: Cooking our seafood, for example our wild salmon portions, is easier than cooking other kinds of proteins, and makes a meal in less than 15 minutes Even better, try our Canned Ivory King Salmon. We frequently hear from hiking and bicycling customers that bringing our canned king salmon in their packs is so much better than bringing those bland overpriced bars, which don’t have as much nutrition.

In addition, our Easy Salmon, packed in one-pound bags, is so versatile for making a diverse array of recipes, perfectly packaged for a family of four or a hungry couple.

Wild Alaska seafood is…

The highest quality of proteins. It is a complete and highly digestible protein, which means that the amino acids are readily absorbed by the body.

A lean protein loaded with omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation and blood pressure and hence strengthen heart health.

Low in saturated fat, high in heart protective monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Low in calories, high in vitamin D. Did you know that 41% of adults in the United States are deficient in Vitamin D? Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon and black cod, contain plentiful Vitamin D and all of the wonders it brings for our bodies. Vitamin D acts as an antioxidant removing the damaging free radicals that are produced in our cells from vigorous exercise.

A good source of potassium, which is an important electrolyte that maintains fluid balance in the body as well as being responsible for proper muscle contraction and transmitting nerve impulses.

Wild Alaska Seafood…

Repairs and rebuilds muscles with its complete array of essential amino acids. Wild seafood from colder waters, like those of Alaska, have very high concentrations of Omega-3 fatty acids. We know Omega-3 fatty acids are good for the heart–they’re associated with a significant reduction in coronary artery diseases. In addition, Omega-3s from marine sources (i.e., wild seafood) are more easily absorbed and digestible than other sources. The most effective Omega-3s are EPA and DHA, the latter Kikka talks about in the video.

May help decrease inflammation caused by intense exercise and reducing the muscle soreness that occurs after workouts. Alaska seafood also has B vitamins, which are responsible for the conversion of muscle glycogen for energy and support aerobic energy metabolism by helping with oxygen transport within the body.

Sources:

Alaska Seafood

Nutrient Content & Variability in Newly Obtained Salmon Data for USDA Nutrition Database for Standard Reference. Jacob Exler, Pamela R. Pehrsson. USDA, Human Nutrition Research Center Program No. 533.7

Issues of Fish Consumption for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction. Susan K. Raatz, Jeffrey Silverstein, Lisa Jahns, Matthew J. Picklo Sr. Review in Nutrients 2013, 5(4), 1081-1097, doi.

AgResearch Magazine August 2015. Americans Missing Out on Seafood Health Benefits

Medline Plus Fish Oil Drug Information at www.nlm.gov/medlinieplus/druginfo/natural/993.html

Long Chain Omega 3 Fatty Acids: EPA & DHA and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Page E. Miller, Marty Van Elswyk and Dominik Alexander, Jan. 2014 American Journal of Hypertension 2014 27 (7) pg 885-896.

Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Position Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and The American College of Sports Medicine. Nancy R. Rodriguez, Nancy M. DiMarco, Susie Langley. March 01, 2010.

Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General (US) 2004 at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45503

Overview of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. University of Maryland Medical Center at https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids