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Alaska Halibut Caprese Recipe

Alaska Halibut Recipe
Alaska Halibut Recipe. Photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood

 

INGREDIENTS

1 sheet (12” x 18”) aluminum foil
4 Alaska Gold Halibut portions
Salt and pepper, to taste
8 oz. fresh mozzarella cheese, cut into 8 slices
8 large fresh whole basil leaves
2 medium tomatoes, each cut into 4 slices
3 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1-1/2 Tablespoons olive oil
1/3 cup chopped fresh basil

INSTRUCTIONS

Preheat broiler/oven to medium-high (450°F).  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and coat with nonstick cooking spray.

Rinse any ice glaze from frozen Alaska Halibut under cold water; pat dry with paper towel.    Place halibut in pan and broil about 5 inches from heat source for 4 to 6 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Turn fillets over and season with salt and pepper.  Broil an additional 1 to 2 minutes.  Cook just until fish is opaque throughout.

Remove halibut from oven and layer 2 slices cheese, then 2 basil leaves, and 2 slices tomato over each portion.  Return halibut to the oven and broil an additional 2 minutes, until cheese begins to melt.

Blend balsamic vinegar and oil.  To serve, spoon dressing over fillets and garnish with chopped basil.

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Fabulous Halibut baked in parchment with spring veggies recipe

halibut in parchment recipe

 

This recipe and photo came from a customer who wrote us simply with this one word “Fabulous”:

 

You can certainly take some liberties with the vegetables and herbs in this recipe, which is a modification of a recipe that originally came from Southern Living. The key is the parchment paper, which keeps the fish moist. The French call this method in papillote. The juices that stay in the parchment paper concentrate the flavors and release an aromatic steam when opened upon serving.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 pound fresh asparagus
  • 8 sweet mini peppers
  • 1 small sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 4 pickled okra pods, halved lengthwise
  • 8 ounces small Yukon gold potatoes, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh dill
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 1/2 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 4 (17-inch) parchment paper or aluminum foil squares
  • 4 x 8-oz Alaska Gold Halibut portions
  • 1 lemon, quartered
  • 4 tablespoons butter

How to Make It

Step 1

Preheat oven to 400°. Snap off tough ends of asparagus, and discard. Toss together asparagus, next 6 ingredients, 1 Tbsp. olive oil, and 1/2 tsp. each salt and black pepper. Divide mixture among parchment paper squares; top each with 1 Alaska Gold Halibut portion. Sprinkle with remaining salt, and drizzle with remaining oil. Squeeze juice from lemon over halibut portions; and top each with 1 Tbsp. butter. Bring parchment paper sides up over mixture; fold top, and twist ends to seal. Place packets on a baking sheet.

Step 2

Bake at 400° for 12 to 16 minutes or until a thermometer registers 135° to 145° when inserted through paper into fish. Place packets on plates, and cut open. Serve immediately.

Step 3

PARCHMENT IS BEST FOR: Fish fillets that are about 1 inch thick.

Step 4

EXPERT ADVICE: Packets must be tightly sealed so they don’t come undone while baking. Make small, snug, overlapping folds to seal each bundle, and then twist the tail ends tightly closed.

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Darlene’s Halibut Tarragon with Mashed Potatoes

Halibut Tarragon
Halibut Tarragon with Mashed potatoes

“This is a recipe that has evolved,” says Darlene, a customer in Port Angeles, Washington. “My husband didn’t use to like halibut as much as I do, but with the tarragon from my herb garden, some lavender salt, mashed potatoes and Annie’s shiitake sesame oil, this recipe is a hit. The mashed potatoes add some heft that he likes and the Alaska Gold halibut is fresh and sweet, which I like, and this recipe brings a nice balance for us.  I bake the Alaska Gold halibut at 425 F for 8-9 minutes and this dish comes out perfectly. The whole family loves it.”

Ingredients

2 Alaska Gold Halibut portions

2 Russet baking potatoes

Cream, to taste

1 T lemon juice

1 T virgin olive oil

Orange-lavender salt to taste

8 to 10 Shiitake Mushrooms

3 oz fresh tarragon, sliced slightly

2 T Butter

2 T Annie’s Shiitake Mushroom Vinaigrette

Ingredients

Mashed Potatoes:
Make mashed potatoes from 2 Russet type baking potatoes. Add milk,
half ‘n half, or cream as you usually would do and mash. Add salt and
pepper to taste, then add butter and whip ‘til smooth.

Season Halibut:
2 – 8 oz. portions of Halibut
1 T. lemon juice
1 T. virgin olive oil
Orange-Lavender salt to taste
White or black pepper
Pre-heat oven to 425 F. Place Halibut on a greased baking sheet (I like
to line with aluminum foil). Bake 8 – 9 minutes. Save any juice. Serve
over Mashed Potatoes.

Tarragon Mushrooms:
8 – 10 Standard or Shiitake Mushrooms, sliced thinly
3 oz. Fresh Tarragon, sliced slightly
2 T. Butter Olive Oil for sautéing
2 T. “Annie’s” brand Shiitake Mushroom Vinaigrette
While Halibut is baking, sauté mushrooms slowly in a small pan (I like
to use an 8 inch non-stick pan) until softened – careful to use low heat.
Add seasonings and Annie’s Vinaigrette. Add any Halibut juices to the
mushrooms and spoon over the cooked Halibut.

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Alaska Halibut with Lemon Dressing Recipe

Alaska halibut with lemon dressing recipe picture

4 Alaska Gold halibut portions, thawed
6 Tablespoons butter, divided
Finely grated zest and juice of 1 large lemon
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
4 sprigs lemon thyme (or ½ teaspoon dried thyme)
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 leeks (white and light green part only), sliced
2 zucchini, sliced
5 to 6 oz. baby spinach leaves
2 Tablespoons dry white wine or vegetable broth

DIRECTIONS

Heat broiler/oven to medium-high heat (450°F)..

Thaw Alaska halibut under refrigeration for 24 hours. Pat Alaska halibut dry with paper towel.  Arrange fillets on a spray-coated or foil lined baking sheet.  Broil 5 to 7 inches from the heat source for about 5 minutes.  Remove fish from oven, and place 1/2 tablespoon butter on top of each fillet.  Sprinkle with 2 teaspoons lemon juice, then season with salt and pepper.  Return to oven and cook an additional 4 to 6 minutes.Cook just until fish is opaque throughout.

While the fish is cooking, add remaining butter to a saucepan with the lemon zest, remaining lemon juice and mustard. Heat gently, whisking until melted, then add the thyme. Keep warm.

Heat the olive oil in a wok or large pan; cook the leeks and zucchini over medium heat until soft. Add the spinach and wine or broth, stirring until the leaves have wilted, about 1 to 2 minutes.

Serve the fish and vegetables, pouring the warm lemon and thyme dressing over fillets.

Cook’s tip: Use regular thyme if you can’t find the lemon variety, or use rosemary instead.

  • Recipe and photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood.
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How to cook Alaska Gold wild king salmon and coho salmon

King Salmon Fillet

Wild salmon from the cold, clear waters of Alaska ranks as some of the world’s finest seafood. For extraordinary taste and extraordinary health benefits, eat more wild salmon.

There is no more optimal source of protein than wild salmon. Lean but dense with nutrients at the same time, wild salmon is a perfect protein. Heart-healthy with the right profile of fat, protein and nutrients, wild salmon is loaded with healthy benefits. It’s even good for your hands and skin!

These tips will help you become a salmon pro:

1. Start with excellent quality salmon. The line-caught wild salmon delivered by Alaska Gold Seafood is of the best quality. This quality comes from the catch methods our fishermen use and the handling procedures on their boats. This quality extends all the way to our customers with careful temperature control and our Alaska Gold Customer Service.

2. Our Alaska Gold salmon is delivered to your door frozen on dry ice to maintain temperature control. Remove dry ice. (DO NOT USE BARE HANDS to remove dry ice!)

3. Put salmon in freezer upon receipt. You should receive tracking info via email to know when to expect delivery.

4. The best way to thaw is to put in your refrigerator for 24 hours. Each individually vacuum-sealed salmon portion can be removed from freezer and thawed in your fridge, one at a time, for use whenever you’d like to eat it.

5. After 24-hour thaw in your refrigerator, remove and cut open vacuum-sealed package. Remove salmon portion from package.

6. Rinse and dry the fillet with a paper towel. Let sit out on your counter for a good 20 minutes to let the salmon get to room temperature. (When it’s too cold, the salmon will stick to your grill or pan.)

7. Marinate if desired in a favorite purchased or prepared marinade.

8. Pre-heat the grill if grilling or the pan if sauteing. We have some seafood cooking tips here on how to roast, bake or poach our salmon. Poaching is an excellent method to enjoy our coho salmon. If grilling, we’re big advocates of using a tin foil to make a tent to help retain the salmon’s moisture. Dry salmon is the worst and the best thing you can do is to prevent dryness. Using the “tin foil salmon tent” goes a long way to help retain the salmon’s moisture and natural flavors. Cook for about 10 minutes per inch of fish thickness. Turning is not necessary. Start “checking” the fish after 8 minutes. We like the fish when it starts flaking easily. We encourage you to cook slowly if grilling or baking–250º F is a great temperature, though there are merits to cooking at higher temperatures. We have some wild salmon recipes here.

9. DON’T OVERCOOK!! This is probably the biggest mistake made when cooking seafood. Overcooked fish is dry and unpalatable. When you remove your salmon fillets from the grill, they will continue to cook a little as they sit, so remove them from the grill when they are just nearly done. Salmon is done when it turns a light pink color throughout and feels firm when pressed gently with the back of a fork. Enjoy!

Many of us enjoy our Alaska Gold salmon with the most basic of pairings. Sea salt and a little pepper. I use the dried lavender from my yard, some sea salt and an orange rind to make a lavender sea salt rub, the seasoning that I have most often on my grilled salmon. Other herbs from the garden that pair well with salmon include dill and tarragon. The combination of honey and soy makes a savory sweet combination that goes well with salmon. Lemon and garlic also go well. Take 2 tablespoons butter, 2 teaspoons garlic, the juice from one lemon, a dash of of pepper and two of our coho salmon portions to make a simply delicious meal. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in garlic. Season salmon with pepper and a pinch of salt. Put portions in skin side up for four minutes and then flip and cook for another four minutes. Squeeze some lemon juice onto the salmon. You can substitute olive oil for butter.

How to pick a salmon: There are 5 varieties of commercially available wild Pacific Salmon. Each of these 5 have their virtues. In terms of richness, king salmon (otherwise known as chinook) is king. King salmon are the largest of the five species and are prized for their high oil content and are the salmon frequently featured on upscale restaurant menus. Sockeye salmon is also very flavorful and is known for its distinctive bright red flesh color and complex, robust flavor. Coho salmon (which is frequently called silver salmon) is known for its milder flavor. Families with children enjoy coho salmon but kids like the mild flavor. Coho salmon is best when line-caught like our Alaska Gold salmon. Versatile, coho salmon is a great option to grill or poach. It’s also the perfect salmon with which to make gravlax. If you smoke salmon or cure salmon at home, coho salmon is ideal. Keta salmon is also called chum salmon or dog salmon because it was fed to sled dogs. Though maligned as dog food, when caught in its silver bright color, keta salmon has a mild, nutty flavor, which can be quite pleasant. Pink salmon, which fishermen call “humpies” for the humpback that male pink salmon develop when spawning, is the most populous salmon. It cans and smokes well, which is how you’ll most frequently encounter it. Fish sold as Atlantic salmon, Scottish salmon, or New Zealand salmon is sure to be farmed salmon, as there are no commercially available wild Atlantic salmon in the United States and farmed salmon were introduced to New Zealand. Our Alaska Gold salmon is all wild-caught in the cold, clear waters of Alaska, which has sustainable fishing written into the state constitution. It’s quicker and less expensive to produce a farmed salmon than catching a wild salmon, but quality, in addition to environmental and ethical concerns factor into that lower price. Some people find farmed salmon flabby and off tasting. We find our wild-caught Alaska Gold salmon to have superior flavor, color and a firmer texture. In addition, with state of the art freezing technology, our Alaska Gold salmon can be enjoyed year-round. We recommend storing in your home freezer for no longer than 3 months. Ideally, use the coldest setting on your freezer. Those with dedicated meat/seafood freezers will get longer shelf life on their seafood because opening and shutting the door on your freezer presents slight temperature changes, which are second only to poor boat and dockside handling in terms of reducing quality in seafood.

Every once in a while, customers request a whole salmon. We have thought of offering whole salmon through our website. However, how would we box it in a manner suitable for a home consumer? Each salmon weighs a different amount. It would be difficult to make a consistent size package every time. Also, if we’re feeding a family of 5 to 6, then a whole salmon might make sense. But most people are feeding two to four people at mealtime and usually don’t have the space in their kitchen to “break down” a salmon. Filleting and “breaking down” a salmon is much more difficult than it looks. So we do that all for you. We offer individually vacuum-sealed portion packages. The most popular are our 8-ounce king salmon portions and our 6-ounce coho salmon portions. For those filling their freezers or sharing with friends to buy for a larger group, we offer discounted prices on our bulk salmon offerings. We also offer what we call fillets but most customers will identify as “sides.” These are the whole side of the salmon. These  wild coho salmon sides are ideal for making gravlax and for grilling. Just contact us with any questions on the ideal amount to order.

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon Burger Meat be made into burgers, tacos, even a breakfast hash for nutrient-dense, family-friendly meals. Check out the long list of Easy Salmon Recipes made by our customers.

 

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Paul’s Chowder Recipe with Easy Salmon and Halibut

Easy Salmon Chowder
The boat sways too much to get a picture like this, so here’s what the chowder looks like in a studio setting.

Dear Alaska Gold Customer,

Many of you we’ve never spoken a word to. With others, you call in, tell us about your families, your dinners, your recipes, your pets, your favorite musicians, the weather where you live, and many other things. We know some of you pretty well. To some of you, we’re like the local fish monger, who you go chat with while buying fish although, in most cases, we’re far away.

Megan and I will even occasionally have customers on the phone ask us if we’re fishermen, too. The short answer is no. We’re too busy fielding calls, answering emails, making sure fish gets to the right place. We work for the fishermen.

However, I spent some time this summer on a trolling boat with one of our fishermen/owners, Carter Hughes, who fishes on the 36-foot F/V Astrolabe. I did my best as a deckhand, learning the tricks of the trade, seeing the fishing life up close and personal. It’s a lot harder than it looks.

Over the next few months, I’ll share some stories from my journal that details my days out trolling for salmon.

Today, since there’s snow on the ground, I wanted to share a story from my journal about a delicious chowder I had out to sea that warmed my heart. Paul’s Chowder.

July 24th

We pass Cape Amelia and Sea Lion Rocks, watching sea lions hauling out on the prehistoric-looking coast.

Baranof Island is 90 miles long and Kruzof maybe 25 miles. Kruzof looks so tiny on a map, but it takes hours to make our way to Salisbury Sound, which separates Kruzof from Chichagof Island.

Chichagof and Baranof are two of the ABC islands (Admiralty being the third) the most densely populated areas for coastal brown bears on the planet. Kruzof, though smaller and uninhabited–a few logging roads and forest service cabins here and there—also has plenty of brown bear. It’s a wild coast where the rare Alaskan surfer or hunter might tread a path through the dense wilderness in pursuit of adventure.

“It looks small on a map because Alaska is so huge,” Carter nudges me into an epiphany that repeats itself every time I’m up in the 49th state. Big Country.

By 1:30, we can see the Khaz Peninsula in sight of a cove in which Carter is planning to anchor.

At the helm of a salmon fishing boat
Carter at the helm

A little before 6, Carter aims the auto-pilot to tack toward the tiny islands surrounding the Khaz Peninsula and Khaz Head, an imposing peak that looks down at us. We continue trolling while Carter cooks dinner, a halibut/salmon chowder, the recipe for which came from Paul Olson, who fishes on the F/V Pacific Flyer, and is an environmental lawyer when he’s not out trolling. In our co-op, fishermen bring a whole range of backgrounds—there are lots of schoolteachers, a few former investment bankers, even a retired astronaut. Carpenters, chemists, poets, lifers (those who represent multiple generations in the fishing business). We have a few fishermen/owners who hail from New York City who gave up that fast-paced life of riches for the rich life of Sitka Sound. A few decades ago, a Swiss banker turned author and his world-touring concert pianist spouse made their way to Sitka to live this unique lifestyle, too–their children continue the fishing tradition.

Looking out at Slocum Arm and Khaz Peak on Chichagof Island.

Fishing is still one of those last refuges where you can be about as close as possible, at least in 2017, to a free and wild existence that truly demands just about everything. Those who seek it out are truly hardy souls, but they’re rewarded with the sights of some beautiful country and working in a profession that means something at the end of the day. We feed people. Which is sacred.

We pull the gear before 8. Fairly slow fishing with no feed in the water that we can see. We were struggling to get out of a dead zone that seemed to be following us. We felt better once we stopped, knowing that tomorrow would be another day.

I’ve been blessed with good weather on this trip, but a slight drizzle mixed with the wind chills my bones.

Paul’s chowder is the perfect tonic to warm me up and I wolf it down. Carter shows me his journal where he had scrawled the recipe.

 

Ingredients:

Halibut (one 8-oz portion)

Bacon (two or three strips)

Easy Salmon—one 1-pound package (Our Easy Salmon can be used in combination or in lieu of the bacon)

1/2 onion, diced

4-6 red potatoes, diced

2 Carrots, diced

4 cups Chicken broth

1 cup cream (milk or half & half will be too thin)

1 Celery stock, diced

Fresh Tarragon

Thyme

Dill

Black Pepper

Instructions:

Cook bacon pieces separately. Heat 1 to 2 cups chicken broth. At same time saute veggies in olive oil. Add bacon to chicken broth and mix in some thyme, tarragon and dill. When veggies are 2/3 done, add to chicken broth and spike again with chopped seasonings. When veggies are fully cooked spike again with chopped seasonings and add Easy Salmon and halibut. When fish is cooked add cream and simmer for 15 minutes (don’t boil cream!).

Carter is quite a cook and I look forward to sharing more galley recipes and fishing stories from the F/V Astrolabe over the next few months.

Stay warm and stay in touch,

KendallSeafood Chowder Recipe

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What’s so special about Alaska Gold Halibut?

pan-seared halibut
Pan-seared halibut

What’s so special about Alaska Gold Halibut?

Simply put, what’s special about halibut is their luscious flake, which is delicate but meaty. Its snow white meat and naturally sweet, delicate flavor and firm texture that retains its shape with any cooking style makes it the world’s premium white-fleshed fish, making it wildly popular with all kinds of chefs. Halibut is not unlike a white-colored steak, which makes them widely popular. And our Alaska Gold Halibut are caught by a fishermen-owned co-op whose quality comes from integrity, a pride in being fishermen-owned for more than 70 years. In addition, Alaska Halibut are managed for sustainability.

Our Alaska Gold halibut are caught by fishermen like Dick Curran, the Humble Highliner, who have an incredibly close connection to the special waters where our fish come from.

Halibut are delicious cooked in a variety of ways–this pan-seared halibut recipe is just one of an endless number of possibilities for halibut.

Halibut are as flat as a board and they spend a good portion of their lives roaming the ocean floor. What’s really wild and unusual about halibut is that they are born with eyes on each side of their head–however, after six months their left eye migrates to join the right eye on their “dark side,” giving halibut two eyes on the same side of their heads. Their top side or “dark side” with two eyes is a dark green-ish to brown-ish color to match the color of the ocean floor. This color camouflages them from predators like sharks and orcas (killer whales) who also enjoy the taste of a fine halibut. If they leave the ocean floor to migrate, for example, their bottom side is a snowy white and a predator looking up will have trouble distinguishing the halibut if the sun is shining above them through the water.

Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) are a type of flounder. Hippoglossus means “horse tongue,” which refers to the halibut’s large mouth and tongue. Stenolepis means narrow scale and refers to the halibut’s almost invisible scales.

There are Atlantic halibut, too. However, they are on the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch program’s “Avoid” list because the Atlantic halibut stock is depleted. In contrast, Pacific Halibut coming from Alaska is recommended and on the Seafood Watch’s “Recommended List,” as its certified by the Marine Stewardship Council. The Pacific halibut stocks are healthy and carefully managed. Since they are fish that cross international borders between Canada and the United States in their migrations, in 1923 the International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) was formed. The IPHC was the first international treaty in the world established with the purpose of protecting a marine resource. Biologists from both countries work together to understand the lives and migration patterns of the halibut in order to preserve the halibut for future generations. The IPHC has been able to maintain a stable fishery and prevent stock and environmental problems that have caused problems in other parts of the world. Fisheries scientists around the world look at the IPHC as a model of good fishery management.

During the summer, halibut feed on the continental shelf, but then migrate to deeper waters during the winter, spawning somewhere on the continental slope along the way .

In Southeast Alaska, the Tlingits harvested halibut during spring and this rich bounty from the sea made the Tlingits one of the richest societies in human history with nourishing foods and meaningful arts. Traditional Tlingit halibut hooks consist of two pieces of wood, usually alder and cedar, lashed together at an angle of roughly 30 degrees with split spruce root. They used a rock as an anchor and fished in canoes up and down the coasts of what we now call Alaska and British Columbia.

Halibut in Tlingit native art style
A “Healing Halibut” in the Tlingit art style spotted at the Fred Hutch Cancer Center in Seattle.

The long lines used today, though operated on somewhat bigger boats with diesel power, work with principles that aren’t that different than those used by the Tlingits. Typically, long liners use an anchor and buoy to spread long lines baited with salmon, squid or herring on a “ganion.” After 12 hours or so of “soaking” the lines on the bottom of the ocean, the captain finds the buoy and the fishing crews haul up the lines and the halibut using what the fishermen call a gurdy, which is a hydraulically powered winch used to pull up the heavy lines. 

Pacific Halibut
A herd of halibut migrating.

Male halibut can reach 100 pounds but females can weigh upwards of 500 pounds. Bigger fish mean more eggs. A 50-pounder lays about 500,000 eggs. A 250-pounder can lay 4 million eggs. Large halibut are called “barn doors,” because they’re flat and large and you can imagine what it’s like to haul them up from the bottom of the ocean–hard work! When they’re smaller they eat shrimp and small crabs. Then they move on to octopus, squid and other fish.

Alaska Halibut
The crew of the F/V Sword with a very large halibut on the co-op’s docks in Sitka, Alaska.

Halibut are particularly important to the history of our fishermen-owned cooperative, which was formed by fishermen who processed halibut in vitamin A. This was in the time before vitamin A was synthesized.  Up until 1980, Seafood Producers Cooperative was the Halibut Producers Cooperative. The name changed to more accurately reflect the other fish being caught (particularly wild salmon and black cod), but halibut has always been the backbone of this organization.

***

A lot of the information from this blog post is shared in a beautifully illustrated, kid-friendly book Pacific Halibut: Flat or Fiction?

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Easy Work Lunch: Mason Jar Canned Salmon Salad Recipe

Mason Jar Canned Salmon Salad Recipe“Real food in a package that fits your life.”

It’s difficult to eat healthy, nutritious meals when you’re on the go and getting the kids ready for school. Here’s an easy-to-pack, nourishing desk lunch.

The beautiful colors of this salad not only pop out and provide delightful eye candy , but the broad range of colors also mean  a variety of nutrients. The addition of our Southeast Alaska Line-Caught Wild Ivory King Salmon provides a healthy dose of Omega-3 fatty acids, lean protein, B vitamins, and vitamin D. Because of this powerful punch, our wild salmon is known to support heart and brain health.

The canned salmon is already cooked and you can prepare the quinoa and potatoes all at once on Sunday night for easy assembly of your salmon salads later in the week. The salad also includes cherry tomatoes, greens and cheddar cheese for a full cornucopia of flavor and nourishing ingredients. Using a mason jar makes it easy to transport this healthy, nutrient-packed salad to work without it getting soggy. The strategic layering will keep all the ingredients  fresh and crisp.

 

 

Ingredients

Dressing:

1⁄2 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons golden balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon sugar

juice from 1/2 a lime

1 teaspoon Montreal Steak Seasoning

1 pinch sea salt

Salad:

9  small medley potatoes (pick a variety of purple, Yukon Gold, and red potatoes)

16 cherry tomatoes (sliced into fourths)

1 cup organic cheddar cheese

1 cup cooked quinoa

2 cans Alaska Gold Canned Wild Ivory King Salmon (6oz each)

2 tablespoons avocado mayo (or sub your favorite mayo or greek yogurt)

2  sweet peppers (diced)

5 ounces greens (spinach/baby butter lettuce/rainbow chard)

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.

Slice potatoes into fourths, lengthwise… then place them in a large mixing bowl.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 tsp lemon juice, then stir to coat the potatoes evenly.

On a foil lined cookie sheet, lay the potatoes in a single layer. Bake for 20 minutes… until golden brown and crispy on the outside.

Meanwhile, combine all of the dressing ingredients in a small jar (olive oil, balsamic, sugar, lime juice, Montreal steak seasoning, and sea salt). Use a whisk to mix it.

In a small bowl, flake the canned salmon with a fork, then stir in the avocado mayo and diced peppers. Set aside.

To assemble jars

Make sure to pack the mason jars in the specific order described to keep the salad from getting soggy. First comes the dressing. Divide it evenly between the four jars (approximately 2 tbsp per mason jar). Then top with a handful of roasted potatoes. Then add 1/4 cup quinoa to each jar. Then, add about 1/4 cup of the salmon mixture, flattening it in the jar with the backside of a spoon. Then add 1/4 cup cheese to each jar. Then add 1/4 of the sliced tomatoes. Then, add a handful of greens all the way to the top of each jar. You can press them down a bit and add a little more. You want the jars to be completely full so that there’s no movement. Then, top with the mason jar lids.

Keep refrigerated. Bring to work with you in an insulated bag, being mindful to keep the jars upright during travel.

When you’re ready to eat, pour into a large salad bowl. Stir, then devour!

(The mason jar salads will keep in the fridge for 3 -4 days).

Yields four 20-oz wide-mouth mason jars.

Recipe comes from Nosh and Nourish.

Deconstructed Mason Jar Salad Nosh and Nourish. Photo from Nosh and Nourish.
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A Valentine’s Special and a Story About Cold Water

It’s cold out there. Today I skied to the office!

Alaskan fishermen say that the cold waters of the North Pacific mean better metabolism for the fish, raising the oil content, making them richer, more buttery, and more delicious.

Our hook and line fishermen know this to be especially true for our wild salmon. When wild salmon are caught on hook and line, they are by definition actively feeding and therefore at the prime of their life cycle—bright with the freshest taste, the purest color, firm skin, perfect texture, and silky flavor.

Poached Ivory King Salmon with greens
Poached Ivory King Salmon

 

Fish nerds like me share this information with our spouses and friends, entertaining them for hours during romantic dinners. Speaking of which…What are you doing for Valentine’s Day?

spot-prawns-crudoI’m making this spot prawn crudo as an appetizer and then making the”legendary” miso-marinade sablefish. A bottle of cava to accompany. This will, I’m sure, make the fish factoids more interesting.

I suggest you too make a similar heart-healthy meal or many more this month. It is February…American Heart Month. There are so many health benefits to eating wild seafood: rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids, packed with vitamins and minerals, sustainable and pure, and a natural source of astaxtanthins (see chart below).

 

Use this coupon code for 20% off our spot prawns when you add them to an order of other fish during the month of February:

 

heart-healthy-spot-prawns

 

We hope you’re well out there. Stay warm. Keep in touch. We love hearing from you.

wild salmon health benefits infographic

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Olive Oil Poached Alaska Black Cod with Couscous and Saffron Broth

poached black cod recipe close-up
Poached Black Cod with Saffron and Couscous Recipe photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood

 

Alaska sablefish (commonly known as black cod) is on the menu in top restuarants around the country and the world. It is in very high demand for its rich flavor and for being very high in heart-healthy Omega-3s. Sablefish has even more Omega-3s than wild salmon. Our Alaska Gold Black Cod has the added benefit of being harvested in a sustainable manner from a carefully managed fishery in the clean waters of Southeast Alaska. Much of our sablefish is caught in Chatham Strait. Known for its deep waters, which are where sablefish like to dwell, Chatham Strait is a perfect location for harvesting this delicious fish. This recipe came from Amy Freitag, executive chef at the Harrison in TriBeCa.

 

INGREDIENTS

4 Alaska Sablefish portions (6 oz each)

2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

1 onion, medium dice

1 red pepper, chopped

2 stalks celery, small dice

4 cloves garlic, chopped

1⁄2 cup white wine

2 tsp. saffron

6 cups extra virgin olive oil

4 cups chicken, fish, or vegetable broth

2 cups chicken broth

2 cups couscous

Salt and black pepper, to taste

Fresh herb to garnish

 

DIRECTIONS

Method:

In a small stockpot sauté onion, red pepper, celery, and garlic in olive oil until soft. Cook for approximately 10 minutes over medium heat. Once vegetables are soft, add white wine and saffron and cook for 5 minutes until saffron blossoms. Add broth of your preference and simmer for 15 minutes. Strain out vegetables and hold broth aside.

 

In a shallow, high-sided sauce pot heat olive oil over low heat until oil appears wavy. Add sablefish portions into oil after seasoning them with salt and black pepper. Turn the heat to medium and cook for 10 to 12 minutes until fillets are cooked through and very white in appearance.

 

In a separate stockpot, heat 2 cups of chicken broth to a boil and pour over couscous that is in a medium bowl. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Once all stock has been absorbed, couscous is ready.

 

To Serve: Carefully remove fillet with a slotted spatula and place on top of couscous and ladle hot saffron broth around couscous. Garnish with any fresh herbs of your choice. Recommended garnishes are zucchini and tomato, or any other colorful Mediterranean vegetable.

 

RECIPE COURTESY: Chef Amanda Freitag, The Harrison, and Alaska Seafood.