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How do you prepare Alaska Gold Seafood? Share your tips and enter for a chance to win a $100 Gift Certificate

It’s no secret that one of the greatest hurdles that people who don’t like seafood have is that they don’t know how to prepare seafood or are intimidated to cook fish.

We’ve gathered a list of tips on how to prepare seafood that we offer new customers, but would like to ask for tips from you our customers. What’s your favorite way to prepare our Alaska Gold Seafood?

We’re looking for new seafood preparation tips to add to this post on our website. We’re not necessarily looking for recipes, but if you have any easy, quick go-to ways to prepare our fish, we’d love to hear about them.

Send us an email, post on our Facebook page, or our Instagram for a chance to win a $100 Gift Certificate. **Tag five friends on our Facebook page or Instagram and we’ll send you a $20 off coupon

Entries must be made by 11:59pm PST on March 31st. Entries can be made by responding to this email, commenting on our Facebook page, or our Instagram. Winners will be randomly selected and announced by noon PST on April 5th.

There will be one winner each for a randomly drawn email, one for a response to our Facebook page, and one to our Instagram. So, 3 winners total. **Tag five friends on our Facebook page or Instagram and we’ll send you a $20 off coupon

Here are the fine print details and rules for the $100 Gift Certificate drawing. Look forward to hearing from you!

Enjoy,

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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You can’t beat a keta salmon…Sale!

If you haven’t tried our keta salmon portions yet, get prepared for a very pleasant surprise. Here is a glowing review from one of our customers:

“The first time we got the keta salmon portions I cooked them up with a really simple recipe. I baked them up plain at 400° F for 9 minutes. When done I sprinkled some seasoning salt on top and served with a pasta dish. Cooked, they look almost like a white fish like halibut–just a very gentle pink coloring. The taste was a nice blend of mild, moist and delicate. Like the combination of a halibut and salmon. The keta salmon is also like halibut in flavor—not quite as meaty, but really delicate with subtle undertones of pleasant salmon. These keta salmon portions would pair well with other dishes in which you would use halibut or other white fish. We decided to go ahead and order 20 pounds to fill our freezer and feed the family. With the bulk order, it’s a great price for wild salmon that tastes great and is nourishing!”

The vast majority of keta salmon are net-caught as they approach streams and near the end of their lives. In contrast, our Alaska Gold wild keta salmon are caught on hook and line and, by definition, these salmon are actively feeding, and therefore at the peak of their quality. (Keta rhymes with “you can’t beat a…” as in “you can’t beat a keta.) Being line-caught, they are also well taken care of on the boat by the fishermen rather than sitting for long periods of time in big nets. The difference in being line-caught cannot be underestimated. Line-caught wild keta salmon is exceedingly rare, making up less than one percent of keta salmon harvested. These are special fish!

Keta Salmon Curry Recipe

The Alaska Gold keta salmon are the most economic way to get our wild-caught Alaska Gold salmon into your diet. The mild flavor of keta salmon makes it suitable for pairing with flavorful sauces, like this Keta Salmon Curry with Lemongrass and Galanga Recipe.

***Get 10% off 6-portion and 5-pound boxes of keta salmon when you use the following coupon code at checkout:

EatAKeta!

***Get 15% off 10-pound and 20-pound boxes of our Alaska Gold keta salmon portions when you use the following coupon code at checkout:

YouCantBeatAKeta!

*Coupons expire end of March.

Check out our Alaska Gold Keta Salmon portions. You won’t be disappointed with the quality and value!
Enjoy,

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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Sweet Chili Keta Salmon Recipe

Sweet Chili Keta Salmon Recipe
Sweet Chili Salmon Recipe courtesy of Little Ferraro Kitchen


Our friend Samantha Ferraro is the author of The Weeknight Mediterranean Kitchen, a cookbook that extols the beauties of the Mediterranean diet with beautifully simple dishes and colorful photos. This Sweet Chili Keta Salmon recipe isn’t Mediterranean per se, but it’s a quick and impressive dinner that adds great flavor to the mild keta salmon. The sweet chili sauce is brushed on wild keta salmon to create a sweet and savory glaze.

2- Alaska Gold keta salmon portions (6 ounces each)

Salt and pepper

¼ cup sweet chili sauce

1 tsp. soy sauce

1 tsp. grated ginger

Sliced green onions

Sliced Fresno pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit and place salmon filets on a foil lined baking sheet and season with salt and pepper.

In a small bowl, whisk together sweet chili sauce, soy sauce and grated ginger and brush a heaping tablespoon of sauce onto each salmon filet, saving the rest of the sauce.

Bake salmon for 6 minutes and then place under the broiler for 1 minute so sauce will caramelize.

Brush additional chili sauce as soon as it comes out of the oven. Garnish with sliced green onions and sliced Fresno.

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Keta Salmon Curry with Lemongrass and Galanga Recipe

Wild Salmon Coconut Curry Recipe
Wild Salmon Coconut Curry Recipe from Samantha Ferraro of Little Ferraro Kitchen.

Our friend Samantha Ferraro is the author of The Weeknight Mediterranean Kitchen, a cookbook that extols the beauties of the Mediterranean diet with beautifully simple dishes and colorful photos.

This Keta Salmon Curry with Lemongrass and Galanga Recipe is not necessarily Mediterranean per se but borrows heavily from the colorful vegetable-forward beauty of Mediterranean cuisine. In this dish, wild keta salmon is poached with strong Thai flavors of ginger, galanga and lemongrass in a robust curry.

2 tbsp. coconut oil

1 small shallot, sliced

2 garlic cloves, chopped finely

1 small jalapeno, seeded and chopped finely

1 inch piece of ginger, peeled and sliced

1 inch piece of galanga root, sliced

2 stalks of lemongrass, gently crushed

½ tsp. ground coriander

½ tsp. ground curry powder

2 tbsp. panang or red curry paste

1 tsp. brown sugar

1 can coconut milk

2 Alaska Gold keta salmon portions (6 ounces each)

Salt and pepper

Lime wedges

Cilantro and mint leaves

Sliced Fresno pepper

Add coconut oil to a large skillet and being to medium-high heat. Add sliced shallot, garlic and jalapeno and sauté until shallot is translucent but not browned.

Stir in the ginger, galanga root, lemongrass, spices and curry paste and sauté for 30 seconds. Then add in brown sugar and coconut milk and stir to combine.

Nestle in the salmon and season with salt and pepper. Place a lid on the skillet and cook for 6-7 minutes until curry mixture has thickened slightly and salmon is cooked through.

Once done, you can flake the salmon for easier serving and garnish with fresh cilantro and mint leaves, sliced chili and lime wedges.

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Seared Alaska Halibut with Pistachio Pesto Recipe

Seared Halibut Pasta with Pistachio Pesto. Photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood and Alaska from Scratch.

Ingredients

For the roasted tomatoes:
2 cups small yellow and red tomatoes, such as grape and cherry, sliced in half
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
 
For the pistachio pesto:
1 cup shelled roasted pistachios
1 cup basil  leaves
1⁄4 cup cilantro
2 cloves garlic
Zest of 1 lemon
3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
1⁄2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Kosher salt

16 ounces angel-hair pasta
1 tablespoon avocado oil
4 Alaska Gold Halibut portions (8 ounces each)
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. To make the roasted tomatoes: Pre-heat the oven to 400°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Arrange the tomatoes on the pan. Drizzle the tomatoes with the olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Roast for 15 to 20 minutes, or until softened and blistered.

2. To make the pistachio pesto: Mean- while, in a food processor, combine the pistachios, basil, cilantro, garlic, lemon zest, cheese, and 1⁄4 cup of the olive oil. Process on medium speed, drizzling in more olive oil as needed to reach the desired consistency. The pesto should be slightly thinner than a paste, but not runny. Season with kosher salt to taste.

3. Prepare the pasta according to package directions for al dente. Drain lightly, reserving about 1⁄4 cup of the pasta water. Return the angel hair to the pot with the pasta water. Stir in the pesto until coated.

4. In a cast-iron skillet, heat the avocado oil over medium-high heat. Pat the halibut fillets dry and season them with salt and pepper to taste. Sear them until browned on the bottom, about 4 minutes (see note). Gently turn them with a metal fish spatula and cook for 60 to 90 seconds, or until cooked to medium-rare to medium in the center, being careful not to overcook, or they will become dry.

5. To plate the pasta: Divide the pes- to-coated angel hair among 4 pasta bowls. Top each bowl of pasta with a halibut fillet. Distribute the roasted tomatoes evenly among the 4 bowls. Serve promptly with freshly grated Parmesan.

Note: Searing time will vary depending on the thickness of your fillets. If your fillets are quite thick, the cast-iron skillet can be transferred to a 350°F oven to finish cooking. But again, be very careful not to overcook and dry out the halibut.

Recipe courtesy of Alaska Seafood originally from
 Alaska from Scratch by Maya Wilson. Copyright ©2018 by Maya Wilson.

See how it’s done below.

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Eat Wild Alaska Seafood and Live Longer

Wild Alaska Seafood Health Benefits
Image courtesy of Alaska Seafood

Eat wild Alaska Seafood and live longer.

It might seem like an outlandish claim that we’ve found the fountain of youth, but more evidence keeps showing up that that eating seafood might not only improve longevity, but the quality of life in old age.

recent study revealed that higher levels of Omega-3 fatty acids found in cold water fish are associated with a lower risk of unhealthy aging (longer version of the study here). Another study, which looked at 2700 generally healthy American adults and how the Omega-3s in their blood affected their lives, showed that older adults with higher levels of omega-3s have a 27% lower risk of prematurely dying from all causes and a 35% lower risk of dying from heart disease. Those who have the most heart-healthy Omega-3s in their diets live, on average, 2.2 years longer than those with the least.

But it’s not just living longer on average that makes seafood special, incorporating more seafood as part of our diets is also associated with healthier aging. A study of over 2,500 adults between 1992 and 2015  found that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids present in seafood reduce the risk of unhealthy aging. The study found, after correcting for other factors such as age, sex, and race, that adults with higher levels of EPA and DPA had a better chance of healthy aging. Healthy aging is defined as a living a meaningful lifespan without chronic diseases.

The study found, after correcting for other factors such as age, sex, and race, that adults with higher levels of EPA and DPA had a better chance of healthy aging. Participants with the highest level of omega-3s present had an 18 percent lower risk of unhealthy aging. Participants with the highest levels of EPA and DPA, the omega-3s commonly found in seafood, had the best results: Those with high levels of EPA had a 24 percent lower risk of unhealthy aging, and those with DPA had an 18 percent lower risk of unhealthy aging.

“We found that older adults who had higher levels of omega 3 from seafood were more likely to live longer and healthier lives,” lead study author Heidi Lai of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston told Reuters. “These findings support current national dietary guidelines to consume more seafood.”

Based on these studies, nutritionists and health professionals are coalescing around the following recommendations:

  • Eating fish two or three times per week can reduce risk of chronic disease.
  • The lean protein and omega-3s in wild Alaska seafood make it a smart, nutritious choice.
  • Eating seafood is good for your heart.
  • Eating seafood not only lowers blood pressure, but can help potentially reducing risk of stroke, depression, Alzheimer’s, and other chronic diseases.

The healthy omega-3 fats, lean protein, vitamin D, and selenium in fish prove so powerful that both the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the American Heart Association recommend eating seafood at least two times a week.

This February we’ll be celebrating American Heart Month. With one in four deaths in the United States caused by heart disease, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. The good news is that heart disease can often be prevented when we make healthy choices. One healthy choice to make is including more seafood in our diets. A number of our customers have noted on the phone with us that their doctors’ recommendations of including more seafood in their diets led them to find Alaska Gold. With our line-caught wild salmon and sablefish, which are particularly high in Omega-3s, you can’t go wrong. Being line-caught means that the salmon are by definition actively feeding, at their peak, and especially loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids.

Alaska Seafood is also good choice if you are watching salt in your diet. Evidence suggests that eating seafood with omega-3s contributes to lower blood pressure, especially in people with high blood pressure (hypertension) or on weight-loss diets. In addition, omega-3s act on blood vessels and kidneys to help lower blood pressure. Reducing salt while increasing omega-3 intake further lowers blood pressure.

Eat wild Alaska seafood for your heart. Live longer and healthier.

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It’s not “Salmon.” It’s…

Wild King Salmon

Frequently, when you go to restaurants, menus list something like “Grilled Salmon with potatoes.”

But what kind of salmon is it? And wouldn’t you want to know?

Just as there are many different kinds of meat and a variety of ways that the meat may be raised, there are a lot of different kinds of salmon.

There are Pacific Salmon and Atlantic Salmon. Just about all the commercially available Atlantic Salmon for purchase is farmed. Farmed Atlantic Salmon comes from Norway, Chile, Scotland, Canada, and a number of other places. Note that Chile and Canada have farms on the Pacific Ocean, but they farm Atlantic Salmon there.

Then there are Pacific Salmon, and the great majority of wild Pacific salmon are harvested in the state of Alaska. There are five species of Pacific Salmon. Keeping track of their names becomes confusing because there are several names for each of the five species: King Salmon (frequently also called Chinook Salmon), Coho Salmon (commonly known as Silver Salmon), Sockeye Salmon (also known as Reds), Pink Salmon (colloquially dubbed Humpies, short for Humpback), and Keta Salmon (also called Chums). Each of these wild Pacific salmon species have different characteristics and different flavors.

Describing the flavors of all of these salmon is a subjective endeavor. A wild salmon’s flavor might vary based on a number of factors, including:

  • How the salmon was caught
  • How the salmon was handled on the boat
  • How the salmon was processed
  • What was the cold chain like between the landing the fish and ending up on a diner’s plate
  • How the salmon was prepared

Wild-caught salmon are harvested in several different ways. Typically, they are caught in either gill nets, by purse seine nets, drift nets, or by hook and line (also known as trolling). There are varying levels of cleanliness and care on fishermen’s boats and handling procedures, which will affect quality. As a general rule, most fishing boats in Alaska are small family businesses. Because of this, the small fishing boats in Alaska tend to have a deep and humble pride in the livelihoods that they are leading and the seafood that they produce.

With regard to the different catch methods, typically a line-caught salmon should be of excellent quality because the salmon is by definition caught while the salmon are actively feeding. Troll-caught salmon should be ocean-bright and therefore not going through the degradation process that occurs when a salmon returns to its native stream to spawn. Trolling is a much “slower” catch method than harvesting salmon by net, which can catch hundreds or thousands of salmon at a time. The slower process of trolling allows fishermen to put more time into taking care of each fish, one fish at a time. The salmon are caught one hook, one fish at a time. By bleeding the salmon and gutting it once the salmon comes on board, the fishermen remove the parts of the fish that make its meat flavor taste off. There are a few net fishermen that bleed and gut their salmon, too, greatly increasing the chances of producing a quality salmon. But, in general, because of the extra care given to each salmon that comes with traditional hook and line fishing methods, a troll-caught or line-caught salmon is going to be the crème de la crème. Less than 2% of Alaskan salmon are line-caught, so they are indeed a special treat to be savored. Note that Alaska Gold Seafood comes from a cooperative of fishermen that primarily fish by hook and line methods. Our wild salmon is line-caught at the peak of its quality in the pristine waters of Alaska.

Of the Pacific salmon, there are king salmon. With meat colors ranging from orange-red to creamy white, these are the largest and least numerous of the Pacific salmon. King salmon tend to return to bigger river systems to spawn and to prepare for this journey up big, fast-moving streams, they build up a lot of (good) fat. Their big flake and succulent, rich flavor and very high oil content make them very much in demand and the most popular seafood item we sell. The best way to cook would be a slow grill at 275° F over a flavorful hardwood like alder or cedar. Capers or mustard-y acidic sauces will help balance out the fish flavor of a king salmon. Some customers pan sear for roughly 4 minutes a side. A simple bake at 400° F for 10-12 minutes will work, too.

A very close second is our coho salmon. Milder and more delicate, with a peachy orange color, coho salmon’s quality and flavor benefit greatly from being line-caught, as their delicate meat, prized for pairing with fine meals, is kept in pristine condition with the dedicated handling procedures practiced on trolling boats. Like king salmon, coho salmon are rich in oils and coho salmon are particularly rich in vitamin D, while being leaner than king salmon. Their mild flavor makes them easy to pair with all kinds of recipes and a family favorite and pleasing also to picky eaters and children alike.

Another species of salmon that benefits from being line-caught is keta salmon. Most keta salmon are caught in nets as they approach streams and the end of their lives with poor meat quality, making them eventually sold in lower-end markets. In contrast, our Alaska Gold wild keta salmon are caught on hook and line and by definition they are actively feeding and at the peak of their quality. The difference in being line-caught cannot be underestimated. Our Alaska Gold keta salmon are very mild, moist, and delicious, and can be used in a variety of recipes, like this Keta Salmon Curry with Lemongrass and Galanga Recipe or this Sweet Chili Keta Salmon recipe. One of the best ways to enjoy keta salmon is slow-grilled with teriyaki sauce. A blackening seasoning or creamy sauces like those used for a Halibut Olympia recipe also work really well with keta salmon.

Sockeye salmon is one of the more numerous Alaskan salmon. They are prized for their deep red color, firm texture and robust flavor. They are plankton eaters and do not usually take hooks, so they are rarely caught on hook and line. From time to time we offer the rare line-caught sockeye salmon we catch for sale on the Alaska Gold website. This is a really, really special item, as less than 1/100th of 1% of sockeye salmon available in stores are caught on hook and line and benefit from both the care given to each fish that is typical for a line-caught salmon and also being caught in a state of active feeding. Sockeye salmon, because of their bold flavor, can hold their own with super-flavorful spices and sauces.

Lastly, there are pink salmon. Pink salmon, with light color and tender texture, when handled well, are a great option for canning and smoking.

Noting that only 12% of world salmon production is wild Alaskan salmon and that the vast majority of the remainder is farmed marks our Alaska Gold wild salmon as something truly unique.

In addition, recent reports have identified that a good amount of seafood sold in supermarkets and restaurants in the United States is mislabeled. A report from Time Magazine noted that 43% of salmon was mislabeled in a recent study—and 69% of that mislabeling was farmed Atlantic salmon being sold as wild.

With the potential for seafood mislabeling, it makes sense to get your seafood from a purveyor that you can trust or direct from the source. Alaska Gold seafood is your direct connection to a cooperative owned by fishermen. Seafood Producers Cooperative (SPC) is a co-op owned by hook and line fishermen and Alaska Gold Seafood is where you can find and buy SPC’s seafood online.

There are also some very important reasons to ask for Alaska salmon rather than “salmon.” All of Alaska seafood is wild-caught. There is no finfish farming in Alaska, so that all salmon is harvested in the wild, pristine waters of Alaska. In addition, Alaska’s seafood is managed to be sustainable. Alaska is the world’s most trusted source of premium quality, sustainable seafood. Alaska is emulated around the world as being a pioneer of sustainable seafood. Harvest by sustainable yield is written into the state’s constitution. In other words, Alaska’s fisheries are scientifically managed so that the long-term health of the fish stocks are top priority. Harvest quotas are managed so that the grandchildren of today’s fishermen should have opportunity to fish in the same way in the future. In addition, the Alaska salmon industry supports America’s economy. As previously mentioned, the vast majority of Alaska salmon fishing boats are small American family businesses. As a whole, the Alaska seafood industry accounts for 111,800 jobs in the United States.

All salmon is nutrient-dense and contain a goodly amount of lean protein, heart-healthy fats, and is packed with vitamins and minerals. What remains questionable is the feed that farmed salmon are given, which can account for an increased chance of toxicity with potential higher levels of pesticides and PCBs, and antibiotics. Salmon farmers would like the public to believe that eating farmed fish “saves” wild fish, but in reality aquaculture has done little to reduce pressure on wild fish stocks, as much of the feed for farmed salmon is wild fish. Some times, it can take as much as 10 pounds of wild fish to make 1 pound of farmed salmon. Salmon farmers have worked to improve these ratios, but salmon farming in Norway has almost completely wiped out the wild salmon runs there. In addition, salmon farms in Canada are contaminating wild salmon with a blood virus piscine ortoeovirus (PRV). It is believed that PRV  causes king salmon red blood cells to rupture. Meanwhile a good number of king salmon runs are in decline in British Columbia. Canada has done little to shift salmon farms outside of wild salmon migration routes. It is the bane of many Alaskan fishermen that salmon farming continues in British Columbia, where it is believed that not only that PRV is being spread to wild salmon, but there are also numerous clean-up issues in waters where salmon are farmed. In addition, Farmed salmon tend to have a flabby texture and flavor, as they are in general fattier, but not with the right kind of fats. Farmed salmon have varying degrees of the heart-healthy Omega-3s for which wild salmon are prized, but usually not in the same beneficial ratio to Omega-6s. This Omega-3:Omega-6 ratio truly makes wild salmon stand out.

With all this information on the variety of salmon out there, wouldn’t you want to know what kind of salmon is on the menu?

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Planked Wild Alaskan Salmon with Mediterranean Medley Recipe

Cedar Plank Wild Alaska Salmon

 

US News and World Report released rankings of best diets for 2019. The Mediterranean diet, which embraces lean meat like seafood, is praised as the most complete and balanced. Best for overall eating and easiest to follow, the Mediterranean diet is an ideal way to seek longer, healthier living.

This Planked Wild Alaskan Salmon with Mediterranean Medley Recipe makes use of Mediterranean herbs and our wild salmon. Check out our friend Samantha Ferraro’s The Weeknight Mediterranean Kitchen cookbook for more Mediterranean recipes.

Ingredients

Alaska Gold Cedar Plank
2 Tablespoons chopped chives
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
2 Tablespoons of one of the following: fresh marjoram, Thai basil, basil, or oregano
3 to 4  Wild Alaskan Coho Salmon portions (6 ounces each)
1/2 lemon
Seasoned salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

 

Instructions

Soak cedar plank in water 30 minutes to 2 hours.  Blend herbs.

Pat wood plank with paper towels and spray-coat or lightly oil one side.  Lay Salmon portions on coated side of plank skin-down.  Squeeze lemon juice on salmon portions. Season liberally with salt and pepper.  Pat/rub 1 to 2 tablespoons herb blend on each salmon portion or all onto salmon side.  Let the salmon rest 5 minutes before cooking.

Heat grill to medium-high heat.  Grill salmon using indirect heat (not directly over heat) in covered grill for 10 to 15 minutes.  Cook just until salmon is opaque throughout.

**

Chef’s Tip: This recipe works great whether you use a plank or cook straight on the grill.  Or, bake at 400°F (6 to 7 inches from heat source) for 10 to 15 minutes.

**

Recipe and photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood

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New Year…New Seafood Routine

Happy New Year!

We hope you and yours are well. Hopefully you’re also starting the new year right with the recommended two to three servings of seafood per week to feed your body and mind. 

We have a lot of customers who only order our King Salmon. Some are very loyal to our famous Gourmet Canned Tuna. Some customers stick with the Halibut.

We all have our routines. Without fail, every week I grill one of our Coho salmon fillets for a Salmon Saturday family meal. For a special weeknight meal, I make our Miso-marinated Sablefish. Tuesday nights, I make salmon tacos with our Easy Salmon. When I forget to bring a lunch to work, I eat our canned tuna or Canned Ivory King Salmon right out of the can. I find this canned ivory king salmon also works perfectly for an easy pasta dish with garlic and capers.

An Instagram follower recently posted this Alaska Gold Halibut with a homemade lime ponzu sauce topped with ginger, green onions on top of steamed rice with broccoli. I’m going to switch up my routine and get this halibut dish into my routine for a nutritious and delicious addition to my routine.

Halibut with Homemade Lime Ponzu Sauce

We used to pack a sampler box with our classic offerings. We are no longer packing this sampler box, but we invite you to customize your own sampler pack to try something new for the new year.

Here’s how you can customize your own variety pack:
 

*Select the fish you want from here. We have box sizes of six portions, 5 pounds and 10 pounds. Combine the species you want. For example, select 5 pounds of halibut and 6 portions of coho salmon. Once you select two or more offers and put them in your cart, enter the following coupon codes at the checkout screen…

With 2 offers in your cart, get $50 off your order with coupon code: 2FishSamplerPack

With 3 offers in your cart, get $75 off your order with coupon code: 3FishSamplerPack

With 4 offers in your cart, get $100 off your order with coupon code: 4FishSamplerPack

In addition, we invite you to try something new. Use the following coupon code for 10% off your order:

TrySomethingNew

Thanks again for being a customer,

Kendall
Alaska Gold Seafood


*Above sampler coupons don’t apply to Loyalty Program subscriptions , bulk orders, or canned items. The TrySomethingNew coupon code does not apply to bulk orders and expires January 31st, 2019.

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Alaska Gold Seafood at the Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco

Our Seafood Producers Cooperative was recently featured at The 2018 Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco. We presented a film about our  producer-owned co-op, and the wild salmon our producers catch  “Tasting Wild Alaska” directed by Sitka’s Liz MacKenzie. We also enjoyed some other wonderful films that displayed the intersection of art and food.

The sold-out Roxie Theater was packed and bristling with energy. The funds raised by the Festival support Cooking Matters, a program that teaches low-income families how to shop for and cook delicious, healthy food.

Wild Alaska Salmon Video

 

Attending the festival for us was a reminder that food stories are people stories. Food and the people who produce and cook food are driven by love and passion.

We really admired James Q. Chan’s “Bloodline,” a  film about Top Chef Tu David Phu and the story behind his family’s culinary legacy, their lives as refugees from Vietnam, and how his parents taught him the secrets of fish and influenced Chef Tu to become who he is today.

Through the camera lens of filmmaker Liza Mosquito deGuia we met Tommaso Conte, chef and founder of D’Abruzzo, an award-winning New York City food vendor specializing in Abruzzese cuisine from Italy. Conte’s passion is the same passion that our seafood producers bring when they are fishing and taking the extra time and work into producing a spectacular fish for your plate.

“Great! Lakes,” a film  about a family-run small scale candy maker in Knife River, Minnesota depicts the craft of making memorable and special food by a family that stays authentic to who they are. We had some of their candy at the after-party and it was to die for.

These were just a taste of the films we saw at the festival. Going to the festival was a reminder to share more of our producers’ stories with you. Which we will. Stay tuned. And thanks for following our stories and supporting our organization.

Enjoy Thanksgiving!

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood