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It’s not “Salmon.” It’s…

Wild King Salmon

Frequently, when you go to restaurants, menus list something like “Grilled Salmon with potatoes.”

But what kind of salmon is it? And wouldn’t you want to know?

Just as there are many different kinds of meat and a variety of ways that the meat may be raised, there are a lot of different kinds of salmon.

There are Pacific Salmon and Atlantic Salmon. Just about all the commercially available Atlantic Salmon for purchase is farmed. Farmed Atlantic Salmon comes from Norway, Chile, Scotland, Canada, and a number of other places. Note that Chile and Canada have farms on the Pacific Ocean, but they farm Atlantic Salmon there.

Then there are Pacific Salmon, and the great majority of wild Pacific salmon are harvested in the state of Alaska. There are five species of Pacific Salmon. Keeping track of their names becomes confusing because there are several names for each of the five species: King Salmon (frequently also called Chinook Salmon), Coho Salmon (commonly called Silver Salmon), Sockeye Salmon (also known as Reds), Pink Salmon (colloquially called Humpies, short for Humpback), and Keta Salmon (also called Chums). Each of these wild Pacific salmon species have different characteristics and different flavors.

Describing the flavors of all of these salmon is a subjective endeavor. A wild salmon’s flavor might vary based on a number of factors, including:

  • How the salmon was caught
  • How the salmon was handled on the boat
  • How the salmon was processed
  • What was the cold chain like between the landing the fish and ending up on a diner’s plate
  • How the salmon was prepared

Wild-caught salmon are harvested in several different ways. Typically, they are caught in either gill nets, by purse seine nets, drift nets, or by hook and line (also known as trolling). There are varying levels of cleanliness and care on fishermen’s boats and handling procedures, which will affect quality. As a general rule, most fishing boats in Alaska are small family businesses. Because of this, the small fishing boats in Alaska tend to have a deep and humble pride in the livelihoods that they are leading and the seafood that they produce.

With regard to the different catch methods, typically a line-caught salmon should be of excellent quality because the salmon is by definition caught while the salmon are actively feeding. Troll-caught salmon should be ocean-bright and therefore not going through the degradation process that occurs when a salmon returns to its native stream to spawn. Trolling is a much “slower” catch method than harvesting salmon by net. The slower process of trolling allows fishermen to put more time into taking care of each fish. The salmon are caught one hook, one fish at a time. By bleeding the salmon and gutting it once the salmon comes on board, the fishermen remove the parts of the fish that make its meat flavor taste off. There are some net fishermen that bleed and gut their salmon, too, greatly increasing the chances of producing a quality salmon. So, in general, a troll-caught or line-caught salmon is going to be the crème de la crème. Less than 2% of Alaskan salmon are line-caught, so they are indeed a special treat to be savored. Note that Alaska Gold Seafood comes from a cooperative of fishermen that primarily fish by hook and line methods, and our wild salmon is line-caught.

Of the Pacific salmon, there are king salmon. In colors ranging from orange-red to creamy white, these are the largest and least numerous of the Pacific salmon. Their big flake and succulent, rich flavor and very high oil content make them very much in demand and the most popular seafood item we sell.

A very close second is our coho salmon. Milder and more delicate, with a peachy orange color, coho salmon’s quality and flavor benefit greatly from being line-caught, as their delicate meat, prized for pairing with fine meals, is kept in pristine condition with the dedicated handling procedures practiced on trolling boats. Like  king salmon, coho salmon are rich in oils and even richer in vitamin D, while being leaner.

Another species of salmon that benefits from being line-caught is keta salmon. Most keta salmon are caught in nets as they approach streams and the end of their lives with poor meat quality, making them eventually sold in lower-end markets. In contrast, our Alaska Gold wild keta salmon are caught on hook and line and by definition they are actively feeding and at the peak of their quality. The difference in being line-caught cannot be underestimated. Our Alaska Gold keta salmon are very mild, moist, and delicious, and can be used in a variety of recipes.

Sockeye salmon is one of the more numerous Alaskan salmon. They are prized for their deep red color, firm texture and strong flavor. They are plankton eaters and so do not usually take hooks, so they are rarely caught on hook and line. At this time, we do not offer the rare line-caught sockeye salmon we catch for sale on the Alaska Gold website.

Lastly, there are pink salmon. Pink salmon, with light color and tender texture, when handled well, are a great option for canning and smoking.

Noting that only 12% of world salmon production is wild Alaskan salmon and that the vast majority of the remainder is farmed marks our Alaska Gold wild salmon as something truly unique.

In addition, recent reports have identified that a good amount of seafood sold in supermarkets and restaurants in the United States is mislabeled. A report from Time Magazine noted that 43% of salmon was mislabeled in a recent study—and 69% of that mislabeling was farmed Atlantic salmon being sold as wild.

With the potential for seafood mislabeling, it makes sense to get your seafood from a purveyor that you can trust or direct from the source. Alaska Gold seafood is your direct connection to a cooperative owned by fishermen.

There are also some very important reasons to ask for Alaska salmon rather than “salmon.” All of Alaska seafood is wild-caught. There is no finfish farming in Alaska, so that all salmon is harvested in the wild, pristine waters of Alaska. In addition, Alaska’s seafood is managed to be sustainable. Alaska the world’s most trusted source of premium quality, sustainable seafood. Alaska emulated around the world as being a pioneer of sustainable seafood. Harvest by sustainable yield is written into the state’s constitution. In other words, Alaska’s fisheries are scientifically managed so that the long-term health of the fish stocks are top priority. Harvest quotas are managed so that the grandchildren of today’s fishermen should have opportunity to fish in the same way in the future. In addition, the Alaska salmon industry supports America’s economy. As previously mentioned, the vast majority of Alaska salmon fishing boats are small American family businesses. As a whole, the Alaska seafood industry accounts for 111,800 jobs in the United States.

All salmon is nutrient-dense and contain a good amount of lean protein, heart-healthy fats, and is packed with vitamins and minerals. What remains questionable is the feed that farmed salmon are given, which can account for an increased chance of toxicity with potential higher levels of pesticides and PCBs, and antibiotics. Farmed salmon tend to have a flabby texture and flavor, as they are in general fattier, but not with the right kind of fats. Farmed salmon have varying degrees of the heart-healthy Omega-3s for which wild salmon are prized, but usually not in the same beneficial ratio to Omega-6s. This Omega-3:Omega-6 ratio truly makes wild salmon stand out.

With all this information on the variety of salmon out there, wouldn’t you want to know what kind of salmon is on the menu?

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Planked Wild Alaskan Salmon with Mediterranean Medley Recipe

Cedar Plank Wild Alaska Salmon

 

US News and World Report released rankings of best diets for 2019. The Mediterranean diet, which embraces lean meat like seafood, is praised as the most complete and balanced. Best for overall eating and easiest to follow, the Mediterranean diet is an ideal way to seek longer, healthier living.

This Planked Wild Alaskan Salmon with Mediterranean Medley Recipe makes use of Mediterranean herbs and our wild salmon. Check out our friend Samantha Ferraro’s The Weeknight Mediterranean Kitchen cookbook for more Mediterranean recipes.

Ingredients

Alaska Gold Cedar Plank
2 Tablespoons chopped chives
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
2 Tablespoons of one of the following: fresh marjoram, Thai basil, basil, or oregano
3 to 4  Wild Alaskan Coho Salmon portions (6 ounces each)
1/2 lemon
Seasoned salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste

 

Instructions

Soak cedar plank in water 30 minutes to 2 hours.  Blend herbs.

Pat wood plank with paper towels and spray-coat or lightly oil one side.  Lay Salmon portions on coated side of plank skin-down.  Squeeze lemon juice on salmon portions. Season liberally with salt and pepper.  Pat/rub 1 to 2 tablespoons herb blend on each salmon portion or all onto salmon side.  Let the salmon rest 5 minutes before cooking.

Heat grill to medium-high heat.  Grill salmon using indirect heat (not directly over heat) in covered grill for 10 to 15 minutes.  Cook just until salmon is opaque throughout.

**

Chef’s Tip: This recipe works great whether you use a plank or cook straight on the grill.  Or, bake at 400°F (6 to 7 inches from heat source) for 10 to 15 minutes.

**

Recipe and photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood

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New Year…New Seafood Routine

Happy New Year!

We hope you and yours are well. Hopefully you’re also starting the new year right with the recommended two to three servings of seafood per week to feed your body and mind. 

We have a lot of customers who only order our King Salmon. Some are very loyal to our famous Gourmet Canned Tuna. Some customers stick with the Halibut.

We all have our routines. Without fail, every week I grill one of our Coho salmon fillets for a Salmon Saturday family meal. For a special weeknight meal, I make our Miso-marinated Sablefish. Tuesday nights, I make salmon tacos with our Easy Salmon. When I forget to bring a lunch to work, I eat our canned tuna or Canned Ivory King Salmon right out of the can. I find this canned ivory king salmon also works perfectly for an easy pasta dish with garlic and capers.

An Instagram follower recently posted this Alaska Gold Halibut with a homemade lime ponzu sauce topped with ginger, green onions on top of steamed rice with broccoli. I’m going to switch up my routine and get this halibut dish into my routine for a nutritious and delicious addition to my routine.

Halibut with Homemade Lime Ponzu Sauce

We used to pack a sampler box with our classic offerings. We are no longer packing this sampler box, but we invite you to customize your own sampler pack to try something new for the new year.

Here’s how you can customize your own variety pack:
 

*Select the fish you want from here. We have box sizes of six portions, 5 pounds and 10 pounds. Combine the species you want. For example, select 5 pounds of halibut and 6 portions of coho salmon. Once you select two or more offers and put them in your cart, enter the following coupon codes at the checkout screen…

With 2 offers in your cart, get $50 off your order with coupon code: 2FishSamplerPack

With 3 offers in your cart, get $75 off your order with coupon code: 3FishSamplerPack

With 4 offers in your cart, get $100 off your order with coupon code: 4FishSamplerPack

In addition, we invite you to try something new. Use the following coupon code for 10% off your order:

TrySomethingNew

Thanks again for being a customer,

Kendall
Alaska Gold Seafood


*Above sampler coupons don’t apply to Loyalty Program subscriptions , bulk orders, or canned items. The TrySomethingNew coupon code does not apply to bulk orders and expires January 31st, 2019.

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Alaska Gold Seafood at the Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco

Our Seafood Producers Cooperative was recently featured at The 2018 Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco. We presented a film about our  producer-owned co-op, and the wild salmon our producers catch  “Tasting Wild Alaska” directed by Sitka’s Liz MacKenzie. We also enjoyed some other wonderful films that displayed the intersection of art and food.

The sold-out Roxie Theater was packed and bristling with energy. The funds raised by the Festival support Cooking Matters, a program that teaches low-income families how to shop for and cook delicious, healthy food.

Wild Alaska Salmon Video

 

Attending the festival for us was a reminder that food stories are people stories. Food and the people who produce and cook food are driven by love and passion.

We really admired James Q. Chan’s “Bloodline,” a  film about Top Chef Tu David Phu and the story behind his family’s culinary legacy, their lives as refugees from Vietnam, and how his parents taught him the secrets of fish and influenced Chef Tu to become who he is today.

Through the camera lens of filmmaker Liza Mosquito deGuia we met Tommaso Conte, chef and founder of D’Abruzzo, an award-winning New York City food vendor specializing in Abruzzese cuisine from Italy. Conte’s passion is the same passion that our seafood producers bring when they are fishing and taking the extra time and work into producing a spectacular fish for your plate.

“Great! Lakes,” a film  about a family-run small scale candy maker in Knife River, Minnesota depicts the craft of making memorable and special food by a family that stays authentic to who they are. We had some of their candy at the after-party and it was to die for.

These were just a taste of the films we saw at the festival. Going to the festival was a reminder to share more of our producers’ stories with you. Which we will. Stay tuned. And thanks for following our stories and supporting our organization.

Enjoy Thanksgiving!

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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The Most Underrated Alaska Seafood Item We Sell

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon sneaks by many of our Alaska Gold customers.

But a number of customers have caught on to this fantastic way to get a high-quality wild salmon in their routines at a reasonable price.

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon, , which is the same salmon we use for our coho salmon portions, is just minced into an easy-to-use ground salmon meat in one-pound packs.

Check out what others have said about our Easy Salmon, which is the same salmon we use for our coho salmon portions, just minced into an easy-to-use ground salmon meat in one-pound packs.

“We have loved regularly receiving Alaska Gold salmon for our family. We thought that we would try the Easy Salmon and see how we liked it, even though we love the fillets. We couldn’t be happier. It is so very easy and quick and extremely versatile. The taste is also delicious. It has made adding seafood into our diet even easier. Now, I always want my freezer stocked with this Easy Salmon! Once again, thank you Alaska Gold Seafood!!”

“Let me just say that my order was over the top fabulous the fish is amazing, the minced coho
made into salmon burgers was over the moon delicious.”

Easy Salmon Cakes Recipe
Easy Salmon Cakes

“I made my first batch of salmon cakes following the recipe I found on the Alaska Gold website and OMG! I was skeptical at first but I’m truly converted: the minced salmon is amazing with no variation in flavor whatsoever […] [T]he easy salmon is delicious and yes, easy to prepare. It took 30 minutes from preparation to sautéing! Dinner in a snap and tasty too!”

“I recently received my first delivery of Easy Salmon. I couldn’t wait to try the Easy Salmon Cakes recipe shown on the Alaska Gold website. The recipe was easy to follow and came out just like the photo – beautiful! My husband and I were amazed with the texture and fresh taste of the Easy Salmon. Ideas of using the Easy Salmon have been spinning in my head. So I came up with Easy Thai Salmon Meatballs with a red coconut sauce recipe. They came out delicious!.”

“First, I am on a very limited budget, but demand the best from my food. I am thrilled with the Alaska Easy Salmon I ordered last time. It is a versatile way to order the salmon as so many different dishes can be prepared with it. Of course, one can’t go wrong with a traditional salmon patty, but I also like to add some to my morning omelet. Even hubby, who does not like salmon, eats this salmon with gusto. Thanks Alaska Gold!”

 

 

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Do you know your fisherman?

Do you know your fisherman?

We’ve got all kinds of fishermen in our fleet. Some are poets, some are mathematicians. We’ve got painters, musicians, rocket scientists. Here’s Mike Rentel who comes from a mechanical engineering background with a minor in math and emphasis on machine design and metallurgy. With an MBA emphasis in finance and entrepreneurship and minors in philosophy and behavioral economics, Mike fishes with a crew that consists of a veterinarian and a cattle rancher, both of whom Mike considers smarter than himself.

Alaska Salmon Fisherman

Mike started fishing summers with his grandpa in high school, trolling out of Ilwaco near the Columbia River. After his grandpa passed away, he finished college, but started up again with a 32-foot pocket-seiner/gillnetter and in a couple of years moved up to leased crabbers and a crew of five doing “deadliest catch” king crabs and tanners in the North Gulf of Alaska in the winter while fishing dungies between Icy Bay and Yakutat in the spring.

Mike met his wife, a geology professor, while she was mapping the sea floor off the coast of Chilean Patagonia and Antarctica. As an engineer keeping all the water, heat and electrical systems running in the remote cold wilderness, she was impressed that Mike could fix just about anything. Being able to fix things on the fly is exactly what it takes to run a commercial fishing boat in Alaska, too.

This spirit of adventure, inherent in all of our fishermen, along with a knack for fixing things helped Mike and his wife win the Spirit of Admiralty sailboat race, the longest inland water sailboat race on the West Coast.

Eventually, Mike “downsized” to the Harmony Isle, a 42-foot Wahl/Seamaster freezer boat. “I specifically chose a freezer-boat because I was committed to producing the best quality seafood possible.”

Alaska Salmon

Mike spends winters in Madison, Wisconsin. As part of our fishermen-owned co-op, Mike is just one of the fishermen owners of our company.

We think what’s special about our Alaska Gold Seafood is that it comes from a fishermen-owned company. What we sell is the fish we catch. It’s not uncommon that the fish sold in many places isn’t what they say it is—the fish passes through many hands before getting to you the customer. Though our fishermen would love to personally deliver fish to you, we think purchasing from our website is almost as good. Fish fraud has been around since before the days when Jesus’s disciples fished the Sea of Galilee. Fishermen being underpaid for their hard work has also been a common practice since biblical times. Which is why fishermen-owned co-ops like ours were formed. As owners of the business, fishermen-owners control their own destinies. We’re quite proud of the work we do. We do it with integrity and transparency. And with a deep pride in our quality.

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On Being Wild

This Thursday we celebrate Wild Whatcom with a benefit dinner at Bellingham eatery and gathering place Ciao Thyme. Wild Whatcom is a local organization that helps kids become healthy, engaged citizens who care about the earth and relish the outdoors, rebuilding a connection to the natural world and instilling an ethic of service to the community.

Wild Whatcom works on the premise that children who participate in the outdoor educational programs they lead have stronger self-esteem and sense of purpose and deeper commitments to stewardship.

Being wild is also who we are as Alaska Gold Seafood. Our wild seafood and our fishermen whose lives are inextricably linked to nature and wildness are the essence of who we are as an organization. Fishing is still one of those last refuges where you can be about as close as possible, at least in this day and age, to nature and a free and wild existence that truly demands just about everything.

One of our fishermen even wrote a book on being wild. Theo Grutter, may he rest in peace after his 40 + years of being part of our fishermen-owned co-op, wrote  Thinking Wild, a collection of 115 short essays, written in a poetic voice that bears his soul. Born in Switzerland, Theo was educated and destined to be a corporate banker but gave it all up to go fishing. Theo fished alone wild and free in the waters surrounding Baranof Island his small boat the Onyx for halibut and black cod. He would bicycle around Sitka and take a week to fast and sit in the trees of the Tongass Forest for a week at a time and meditate on what it means to be wild.

wild seafood
Theo Grutter, on his beautiful small boat the Onyx

 

What is wild? These are the thoughts of a fisherman who spent a lot of time out fishing not alone, but in the company of some of the richest life on the planet: the whales, puffins, and fish in the waters around Southeast Alaska.

One can feel a tremendous amount of energy surrounding Theo as he excited talks about black cod, which he calls “the premier fish caught one kilometer below the surface of the sea.”

From his essay “Thank you, Oceans and Forests, you are a hundred sisters and brothers to me”:

Did you ever wonder why the cormorants never build shrimp farms? Why the pigeons never invented cornfields? Why a whale does not wear a tie? Good question. […] Out here on the ocean I am beyond prudence, politeness, and shame. In this grand immensity, wisdom can run free to do its very vast things like fertilizing my deeper mind.

Theo’s book, Thinking Wild, is not just a fisherman’s meditations on wildness but thoughts on making peace with oneself and how we all live in this world. Here is an excerpt from his essay “The ocean experience”:

Just now leaving the angry open sea behind, white rollers still on my heels. My boat, the Onyx, runs me on autopilot through Sergius Narrows bucking a five-knot tidal current, the Chrysler-Nissan purring like a bee. Hoonah Sound lies ahead. The quietness of six hundred square miles of inside water awaits me, with the Tongass National Forest surrounding the scene. I will set there and tomorrow pull my long line gear for halibut the same way a Kalahari woman smoothly dib-dabs, jar balancing on her head, back from the well. What we love to do turns into rhymes and becomes beautiful.

Through Theo and through our deep relationship with nature, we celebrate being wild. We celebrate the wild. Fishing is still one of those last refuges where you can be about as close as possible, at least in this day and age, to nature and a free and wild existence that truly demands just about everything.

Serving you with pride,

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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What do you do with leftover salmon?

leftover salmon

What do you do with leftover salmon?

First, don’t cook or reheat it!

Make a salad or something that doesn’t involve reheating.

This salad inspiration comes from a customer, who writes: “Made with corn salad (mache) and volunteer arugula from the garden, avocado, croutons made from stale homemade wheat bread, and pieces of leftover Alaska Gold coho salmon filets, plus a little orange-infused olive oil, this salad sure was a winner! My husband doesn’t usually get too excited about salads, but he liked this one so much that he grabbed his phone and took a picture of it totally ecstatic.  The combination of flavors surprised him. He’s a recent salmon convert thanks to Alaska Gold, and he’s no photographer, but this salad, made on the fly when we came home from a morning hike, sure is pretty.”

Salads like this one made from leftover coho salmon are also a really great way to maximize macro and micro nutrients in one meal. The perfect mix is a quality sourced protein, like wild salmon, which is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and some good fats (an avocado, for example), a bed of nutrient-rich leafy greens, and tons of other veggies and add-ons (some Marcona almonds would also work really well) based on our activity levels and what our bodies are needing.

What’s also great about these salads is that they are easy to prep once you have the leftover salmon. 8 to 10 minutes tops.

A lot of our customers order the bulk sized coho salmon filets, and they grill or bake them for a meal. If there are leftovers, tear up the salmon into pieces, and you can make wonderful salads like these. Put them in some Tupperware and bring them with you in your lunch box, and you’ve got a healthy lunch!

Note: It’s also good to remember to not reheat salmon. In general, this causes the salmon’s natural oils to get rancid. Though leftover salmon works really well for example with scrambled eggs for breakfast, it can go into the pan at the very end of cooking.

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Here’s why seafood is an important part of the training regiment of Gold medalist Kikkan Randall

Congratulations to 5-time Olympian and Alaskan Kikkan Randall from the U.S. Cross-Country Skiing team that won the Gold medal in the team sprint at the PyeongChang Olympic Games.

In this video from Alaska Seafood, Kikkan talks about how Alaska Seafood “feeds her fitness.” Wild Alaska Seafood is a lean, high-quality protein. Eating Alaska Seafood was part of Kikkan’s training regimen while pregnant. The DHA, an Omega-3 fatty acid plentiful in Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon, is essential for the nervous system and brain development in babies.

A high-quality lean protein source is important for all kinds of athletes. Whether you’re running in the local 5k or training for the next Olympics, there is no purer, more natural source of protein than wild seafood. Lean but dense with nutrients at the same time, seafood is a perfect protein for athletes.

Achieving peak form is a goal for all of us, whether we’re pro, amateur, or not even practicing athletes. And seafood should be part of all of our diets. Wild Alaska Seafood has such an expansive nutrient profile that meets most of the important physiological demands of an athlete in training.

Wild Alaska Seafood helps athletes…

Recover faster

Convert protein and sugar to energy as an excellent source of vitamins B6 and B12

Augment blood flow

Reduce swelling

Maximize fat loss by lowering triglycerides

Develop focus and mind function

Maintain strong and healthy bones with its exceptionally high vitamin D content

Optimize aerobic capacity

Expand lung performance

Improve joint health

Be Happier

Here’s another huge secret: Cooking our seafood, for example our wild salmon portions, is easier than cooking other kinds of proteins, and makes a meal in less than 15 minutes Even better, try our Canned Ivory King Salmon. We frequently hear from hiking and bicycling customers that bringing our canned king salmon in their packs is so much better than bringing those bland overpriced bars, which don’t have as much nutrition.

In addition, our Easy Salmon, packed in one-pound bags, is so versatile for making a diverse array of recipes, perfectly packaged for a family of four or a hungry couple.

Wild Alaska seafood is…

The highest quality of proteins. It is a complete and highly digestible protein, which means that the amino acids are readily absorbed by the body.

A lean protein loaded with omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation and blood pressure and hence strengthen heart health.

Low in saturated fat, high in heart protective monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Low in calories, high in vitamin D. Did you know that 41% of adults in the United States are deficient in Vitamin D? Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon and black cod, contain plentiful Vitamin D and all of the wonders it brings for our bodies. Vitamin D acts as an antioxidant removing the damaging free radicals that are produced in our cells from vigorous exercise.

A good source of potassium, which is an important electrolyte that maintains fluid balance in the body as well as being responsible for proper muscle contraction and transmitting nerve impulses.

Wild Alaska Seafood…

Repairs and rebuilds muscles with its complete array of essential amino acids. Wild seafood from colder waters, like those of Alaska, have very high concentrations of Omega-3 fatty acids. We know Omega-3 fatty acids are good for the heart–they’re associated with a significant reduction in coronary artery diseases. In addition, Omega-3s from marine sources (i.e., wild seafood) are more easily absorbed and digestible than other sources. The most effective Omega-3s are EPA and DHA, the latter Kikka talks about in the video.

May help decrease inflammation caused by intense exercise and reducing the muscle soreness that occurs after workouts. Alaska seafood also has B vitamins, which are responsible for the conversion of muscle glycogen for energy and support aerobic energy metabolism by helping with oxygen transport within the body.

Sources:

Alaska Seafood

Nutrient Content & Variability in Newly Obtained Salmon Data for USDA Nutrition Database for Standard Reference. Jacob Exler, Pamela R. Pehrsson. USDA, Human Nutrition Research Center Program No. 533.7

Issues of Fish Consumption for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction. Susan K. Raatz, Jeffrey Silverstein, Lisa Jahns, Matthew J. Picklo Sr. Review in Nutrients 2013, 5(4), 1081-1097, doi.

AgResearch Magazine August 2015. Americans Missing Out on Seafood Health Benefits

Medline Plus Fish Oil Drug Information at www.nlm.gov/medlinieplus/druginfo/natural/993.html

Long Chain Omega 3 Fatty Acids: EPA & DHA and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Page E. Miller, Marty Van Elswyk and Dominik Alexander, Jan. 2014 American Journal of Hypertension 2014 27 (7) pg 885-896.

Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Position Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and The American College of Sports Medicine. Nancy R. Rodriguez, Nancy M. DiMarco, Susie Langley. March 01, 2010.

Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General (US) 2004 at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45503

Overview of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. University of Maryland Medical Center at https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

 

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How to make seafood meals easy, delicious, nutritious and rewarding

According to a recent poll, only 30% of American families eat dinner together every night, despite numerous studies underscoring the long-term health and societal benefits of eating together as a family. Research shows that eating family meals together results in a positive impact on health and wellness while reducing obesity rates, eating disorders, risky behaviors in teens and diabetes in adults. Also, when you cook your own meals together, you know what you’re putting in your food, which often is healthier than when you don’t know.

February is American Heart Month and the American Heart Association recommends eating heart-healthy seafood at least twice a week, yet only 10% of Americans get at least 2 servings of seafood a week.

A really fun dinner with friends and family of all ages is our Easy Salmon Cakes recipe. See this review of the recipe and our Easy Salmon from a happy Alaska Gold customer: “I made my first batch of salmon cakes following the recipe I found on the AG website and OMG! I was skeptical at first but I’m truly converted: the minced salmon is amazing with no variation in flavor whatsoever […] The easy salmon is delicious and yes, easy to prepare. It took 30 minutes from preparation and sautéing! Dinner in a snap and tasty too!”

Easy Salmon Cakes
Easy Salmon Cakes

An easy way to get heart-healthy seafood into your family’s weekly plan is to include our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon. Easy Salmon is made from our wild coho salmon, which is a lean protein, low in saturated fats and rich in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins and minerals.

The healthy “good” unsaturated fats found in foods like wild salmon may help lower risk of heart disease, depression, dementia and arthritis. Replacing 5 percent of the so-called “bad” fats like trans and saturated fats with the unsaturated fat in seafood and plant-based foods can reduce your risk of early death by up to 27% percent. The Mediterranean diet which includes fish and plant-based foods seems to improve protective effects and helps burn fat faster. In a study with people aged 18-35 eating foods with polyunsaturated fatty acids—like wild salmon—may improve fat metabolism and lower cholesterol.

Bottom line: The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that we shift from a diet high in saturated fats to a diet rich in heart-healthy unsaturated fats, like those in wild salmon and plant-based proteins. Strive for two to three servings per week.

In addition to the nutritional benefits, most of the Easy Salmon recipes, many from our customers, we have on our website can be made in 30 minutes or less.

These recipes from our customers are fun, unique takes on meals that include our heart-healthy Easy Salmon.

Work Easy Salmon into your family meals routine for easy, delicious, nutritious and rewarding meals together with your family!