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How Seafood Helps Relieve Children’s Asthma

Might Wild Seafood alleviate children with asthma?

An international study led by Australia’s La Trobe University has found that children with asthma who followed a healthy Mediterranean diet enriched with fatty fish had improved lung function after six months. We are finally figuring out that diets high in fat, sugar and salt can influence childhood development and might contribute to asthma in children. “Fatty fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids which have anti-inflammatory properties. Our study shows eating fish just twice a week can significantly decrease lung inflammation in children with asthma.”

The clinical trial involved 64 children aged five to 12 who had mild asthma. Researchers divided the children into two groups and instructed around half to eat two meals of cooked fatty fish (of at least 150 grams) as part of the Greek Mediterranean diet every week for six months. The remaining children followed their normal diet. At the end of the trial, they found the group who ate fish had reduced their bronchial inflammation by 14 units. Above 10 units is significant under international guidelines.

Several great options to get kids excited about seafood are our wild keta salmon and wild coho salmon. Use these tips to get kids excited about seafood:

  • Try it with something familiar. If your child likes Mexican food, try making salmon tacos with our Easy Salmon Burger Meat.
  • Try it at lunch time. Many time kids are more willing to try new food at lunch. It might help to avoid the “witching hour” at dinnertime.
  • Put it on your plate, too. If dad’s eating halibut, maybe junior will too.
  • A favorite dipping sauce can keep it fun and casual. Maybe a soy ginger peanut butter sauce? Tartar sauce? Or a Greek yogurt mixed with Old Bay seasoning. Try whatever your kids really love.
  • Try making seasoned breadcrumbs at home to give the fish a fun and tasty crunch. This would work really well with our halibut or our keta salmon portions.
  • Put your seafood between some bread. Young and old love a burger. Once again, our Easy Salmon Burger Meat works really well for making burgers.
  • Make it fun!
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Why Swap Meat for Seafood…

Wild Alaska seafood is a venerable powerhouse source of nutrients and is of the highest quality of lean proteins. Alaska seafood is a complete and highly digestible protein, which means that the amino acids are readily absorbed by the body. Low in saturated fat, high in heart protective monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, Alaska seafood also boasts a complete array of essential amino acids, which help repair and rebuild muscles, making seafood a great meal for athletes recovering from a workout.

While being relatively low in calories, Alaska seafood is high in vitamin D. Did you know that 41% of adults in the United States are deficient in Vitamin D? Six-ounce portions of our wild salmon and sablefish  contain 90% of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D. Vitamin D has numerous health benefits to our lives and particularly those of us in northern climes do not get nearly enough of it. Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon and black cod, contain plentiful Vitamin D and all of the wonders this vitamin brings for our bodies. In addition to strengthening teeth, bones and our immune systems, vitamin D can help curb depression, maintains good blood pressure, and acts as an antioxidant removing the damaging free radicals that are produced in our cells from vigorous exercise.

Nutritional Benefits of Alaska Seafood with ballet dancer Misty Copeland
Misty Copeland. Ballet Dancer. Photo courtesy of Alaska Seafood.

Alaska seafood is naturally high in essential vitamins E, A and C and also a good source of potassium, which is an important electrolyte that maintains fluid balance in the body as well as being responsible for proper muscle contraction and transmitting nerve impulses.

Just about the only way to get the Omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA recommended by health specialists for heart and brain health is by eating fatty fish from cold waters. Our Alaska Gold Wild Salmon, Sablefish, and Albacore Tuna are some of the fish with the highest concentrations of Omega-3 fatty acids that exist. These fatty acids reduce inflammation and increase heart and brain health.

DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid) is an important nutrient that inhibits aggregation of blood platelets, making it difficult for blood clots to form and thereby enhancing blood flow. The Omega-3 fatty acid DHA is also an important nutrient for generating brain cells and function for learning, especially in the early brain and nerve development of infants, but is also thought to help prevent dementia in elderly people.

EPA (Eicosapentaenoic acid) thins the blood and is effective against LDL (bad) cholesterol. Most importantly, EPA maintains blood and blood vessel health. EPA can help prevent stroke, heart attack, hardening of the arteries, and other coronary diseases.

Seafood is also easier to cook than other proteins. It does not require the cook times that other meats do, for example, and if it’s of great quality, like our Alaska Gold Seafood, it requires minimal seasonings. Pull one of our coho salmon portions out of the freezer, put it in the fridge for 24 hours, then in the oven at 425 F for 6-8 minutes with a few basic seasonings.

Or try our Easy Salmon on sale through the end of June, 2018. Try these Easy Salmon Recipes made by our customers.

 

 

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Here’s why seafood is an important part of the training regiment of Gold medalist Kikkan Randall

Congratulations to 5-time Olympian and Alaskan Kikkan Randall from the U.S. Cross-Country Skiing team that won the Gold medal in the team sprint at the PyeongChang Olympic Games.

In this video from Alaska Seafood, Kikkan talks about how Alaska Seafood “feeds her fitness.” Wild Alaska Seafood is a lean, high-quality protein. Eating Alaska Seafood was part of Kikkan’s training regimen while pregnant. The DHA, an Omega-3 fatty acid plentiful in Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon, is essential for the nervous system and brain development in babies.

A high-quality lean protein source is important for all kinds of athletes. Whether you’re running in the local 5k or training for the next Olympics, there is no purer, more natural source of protein than wild seafood. Lean but dense with nutrients at the same time, seafood is a perfect protein for athletes.

Achieving peak form is a goal for all of us, whether we’re pro, amateur, or not even practicing athletes. And seafood should be part of all of our diets. Wild Alaska Seafood has such an expansive nutrient profile that meets most of the important physiological demands of an athlete in training.

Wild Alaska Seafood helps athletes…

Recover faster

Convert protein and sugar to energy as an excellent source of vitamins B6 and B12

Augment blood flow

Reduce swelling

Maximize fat loss by lowering triglycerides

Develop focus and mind function

Maintain strong and healthy bones with its exceptionally high vitamin D content

Optimize aerobic capacity

Expand lung performance

Improve joint health

Be Happier

Here’s another huge secret: Cooking our seafood, for example our wild salmon portions, is easier than cooking other kinds of proteins, and makes a meal in less than 15 minutes Even better, try our Canned Ivory King Salmon. We frequently hear from hiking and bicycling customers that bringing our canned king salmon in their packs is so much better than bringing those bland overpriced bars, which don’t have as much nutrition.

In addition, our Easy Salmon, packed in one-pound bags, is so versatile for making a diverse array of recipes, perfectly packaged for a family of four or a hungry couple.

Wild Alaska seafood is…

The highest quality of proteins. It is a complete and highly digestible protein, which means that the amino acids are readily absorbed by the body.

A lean protein loaded with omega-3 fatty acids that reduce inflammation and blood pressure and hence strengthen heart health.

Low in saturated fat, high in heart protective monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.

Low in calories, high in vitamin D. Did you know that 41% of adults in the United States are deficient in Vitamin D? Alaska seafood, particularly wild salmon and black cod, contain plentiful Vitamin D and all of the wonders it brings for our bodies. Vitamin D acts as an antioxidant removing the damaging free radicals that are produced in our cells from vigorous exercise.

A good source of potassium, which is an important electrolyte that maintains fluid balance in the body as well as being responsible for proper muscle contraction and transmitting nerve impulses.

Wild Alaska Seafood…

Repairs and rebuilds muscles with its complete array of essential amino acids. Wild seafood from colder waters, like those of Alaska, have very high concentrations of Omega-3 fatty acids. We know Omega-3 fatty acids are good for the heart–they’re associated with a significant reduction in coronary artery diseases. In addition, Omega-3s from marine sources (i.e., wild seafood) are more easily absorbed and digestible than other sources. The most effective Omega-3s are EPA and DHA, the latter Kikka talks about in the video.

May help decrease inflammation caused by intense exercise and reducing the muscle soreness that occurs after workouts. Alaska seafood also has B vitamins, which are responsible for the conversion of muscle glycogen for energy and support aerobic energy metabolism by helping with oxygen transport within the body.

Sources:

Alaska Seafood

Nutrient Content & Variability in Newly Obtained Salmon Data for USDA Nutrition Database for Standard Reference. Jacob Exler, Pamela R. Pehrsson. USDA, Human Nutrition Research Center Program No. 533.7

Issues of Fish Consumption for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction. Susan K. Raatz, Jeffrey Silverstein, Lisa Jahns, Matthew J. Picklo Sr. Review in Nutrients 2013, 5(4), 1081-1097, doi.

AgResearch Magazine August 2015. Americans Missing Out on Seafood Health Benefits

Medline Plus Fish Oil Drug Information at www.nlm.gov/medlinieplus/druginfo/natural/993.html

Long Chain Omega 3 Fatty Acids: EPA & DHA and Blood Pressure: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Page E. Miller, Marty Van Elswyk and Dominik Alexander, Jan. 2014 American Journal of Hypertension 2014 27 (7) pg 885-896.

Nutrition and Athletic Performance. Position Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and The American College of Sports Medicine. Nancy R. Rodriguez, Nancy M. DiMarco, Susie Langley. March 01, 2010.

Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General (US) 2004 at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45503

Overview of Omega-3 Fatty Acids. University of Maryland Medical Center at https://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/omega3-fatty-acids

 

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Wild Salmon and Vitamin D

Graphic explaining benefits of in wild salmon and vitamin D

 

Just one of our 6-ounce wild coho salmon portions has over 90% of the recommended daily value of vitamin D.

Those 19 mcg of vitamin D in a single 6-ounce coho salmon portion are significant!

Seafood, in particular our coho salmon but also our sablefish, is one of the greatest natural food sources for vitamin D. Vitamin D builds strong and healthy bones, heart, muscles, lungs and brain, helps your body fight infection, and is key for good overall health. Vitamin D is oil soluble, which means you need to eat fat to absorb it. And fatty, oily fish and provide some of that fat.

For those doing the math, the 19 mcg of vitamin D in a 6-ounce portion of coho salmon equals 760 IU. The recommended amount of vitamin D to take for most people is 600 I.U. or more per day. And poached, grilled, sautéed or baked, our Alaska Gold coho salmon is a lot more delicious than the supplement pills that people in northern latitudes or those with osteoporosis frequently take. In fact, the vitamin D3 in seafood can be more effective than vitamin D2, which frequently appears in multi-vitamins.

According to research, Vitamin D is believed to:

* Fight cardiovascular diseases

* Lower chances of getting the common cold

* Curb depression

* Strengthen teeth and bones

* Keep hair healthy

* Reinforce the immune system

* Manage blood pressure

* Possibly help prevent cancer

* Help weight loss

There are numerous research studies that highlight the importance of vitamin D in fighting diseases such as multiple sclerosis and decreasing your chance of developing cardiovascular disease. Eating seafood twice a week can reduce your risk of heart disease by at least 36%! It has also been shown to give you more energy throughout the day.

Researchers believe that because vitamin D is important to brain function and that insufficient vitamin D levels may play a role in depression and other mental illnesses, which could mean that taking more vitamin D could help manage our moods and prevent depression.

It has been observed that vitamin D is important for increasing the absorption of calcium and phosphate from the diet you take. Vitamin D also helps in strengthening your teeth’s battle with germs by helping your body absorb calcium and phosphate better. Vitamin D, in itself, is also potentially more important than calcium for bone health. So, vitamin D can help build bones and teeth.

While eating salmon might not give you long locks of bushy hair, vitamin D deficiencies are associated with hair loss.

Vitamin D reinforces the immune system by reducing your chances of developing cold and flu and other respiratory infections.

Though research has not illuminated the hows and whys of the link between vitamin D deficiency and high blood pressure, there is at least a link between getting vitamin D and having lower blood pressure. Vitamin D deficiencies have been linked to a higher risk of heart attacks and increased blood pressure. At a more subjective level, we’ve found that eating fish helps us feel calmer and happier.

Research backs up at least the possibility that vitamin D can be helpful in preventing some forms of cancer. There is early evidence of the possibility of an association between vitamin D and lower risks of cancer in mice, as vitamin D has been shown to slow or prevent the development of cancer in mice. However, the evidence is inconsistent and inconclusive for human beings, so we can’t say what effects taking more vitamin D will have in terms of preventing cancer.

A 2015 study indicates that vitamin D might even help with weight loss.

In general, most of the benefits of vitamin D seem to have the biggest effect with those who were already deficient in vitamin D either from diet or lack of sunshine. If you’re in a particularly dark part of the world or don’t eat enough seafood, you should probably talk to your doctor about getting tested for vitamin D levels. Other groups of people at risk of vitamin D deficiency include those with digestive disorders such as celiac disease. Pregnant and nursing women, as well as women with osteopenia or osteoporosis, frequently need more vitamin D to maintain bone health.

These are just a tiny amount of the links to studies we found supporting vitamin D’s health benefits.