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You can’t beat a keta salmon…

If you haven’t tried our keta salmon portions yet, get prepared for a very pleasant surprise. Here is a glowing review from one of our customers:

“The first time we got the keta salmon portions I cooked them up with a really simple recipe. I baked them up plain at 400° F for 9 minutes. When done I sprinkled some seasoning salt on top and served with a pasta dish. Cooked, they look almost like a white fish like halibut–just a very gentle pink coloring. The taste was a nice blend of mild, moist and delicate. Like the combination of a halibut and salmon. The keta salmon is also like halibut in flavor—not quite as meaty, but really delicate with subtle undertones of pleasant salmon. These keta salmon portions would pair well with other dishes in which you would use halibut or other white fish. We decided to go ahead and order 20 pounds to fill our freezer and feed the family. With the bulk order, it’s a great price for wild salmon that tastes great and is nourishing!”

The vast majority of keta salmon are net-caught as they approach streams and near the end of their lives. In contrast, our Alaska Gold wild keta salmon are caught on hook and line and, by definition, these salmon are actively feeding, and therefore at the peak of their quality. (Keta rhymes with “you can’t beat a…” as in “you can’t beat a keta.) Being line-caught, they are also well taken care of on the boat by the fishermen rather than sitting for long periods of time in big nets. The difference in being line-caught cannot be underestimated. Line-caught wild keta salmon is exceedingly rare, making up less than one percent of keta salmon harvested. These are special fish!

Keta Salmon Curry Recipe

The Alaska Gold keta salmon are the most economic way to get our wild-caught Alaska Gold salmon into your diet. The mild flavor of keta salmon makes it suitable for pairing with flavorful sauces, like this Keta Salmon Curry with Lemongrass and Galanga Recipe.

Check out our Alaska Gold Keta Salmon portions. You won’t be disappointed with the quality and value!
Enjoy,

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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Alaska Gold Seafood at the Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco

Our Seafood Producers Cooperative was recently featured at The 2018 Food & Farm Film Fest in San Francisco. We presented a film about our  producer-owned co-op, and the wild salmon our producers catch  “Tasting Wild Alaska” directed by Sitka’s Liz MacKenzie. We also enjoyed some other wonderful films that displayed the intersection of art and food.

The sold-out Roxie Theater was packed and bristling with energy. The funds raised by the Festival support Cooking Matters, a program that teaches low-income families how to shop for and cook delicious, healthy food.

Wild Alaska Salmon Video

 

Attending the festival for us was a reminder that food stories are people stories. Food and the people who produce and cook food are driven by love and passion.

We really admired James Q. Chan’s “Bloodline,” a  film about Top Chef Tu David Phu and the story behind his family’s culinary legacy, their lives as refugees from Vietnam, and how his parents taught him the secrets of fish and influenced Chef Tu to become who he is today.

Through the camera lens of filmmaker Liza Mosquito deGuia we met Tommaso Conte, chef and founder of D’Abruzzo, an award-winning New York City food vendor specializing in Abruzzese cuisine from Italy. Conte’s passion is the same passion that our seafood producers bring when they are fishing and taking the extra time and work into producing a spectacular fish for your plate.

“Great! Lakes,” a film  about a family-run small scale candy maker in Knife River, Minnesota depicts the craft of making memorable and special food by a family that stays authentic to who they are. We had some of their candy at the after-party and it was to die for.

These were just a taste of the films we saw at the festival. Going to the festival was a reminder to share more of our producers’ stories with you. Which we will. Stay tuned. And thanks for following our stories and supporting our organization.

Enjoy Thanksgiving!

The Folks at Alaska Gold Seafood

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The Most Underrated Alaska Seafood Item We Sell

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon sneaks by many of our Alaska Gold customers.

But a number of customers have caught on to this fantastic way to get a high-quality wild salmon in their routines at a reasonable price.

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon, , which is the same salmon we use for our coho salmon portions, is just minced into an easy-to-use ground salmon meat in one-pound packs.

Check out what others have said about our Easy Salmon, which is the same salmon we use for our coho salmon portions, just minced into an easy-to-use ground salmon meat in one-pound packs.

“We have loved regularly receiving Alaska Gold salmon for our family. We thought that we would try the Easy Salmon and see how we liked it, even though we love the fillets. We couldn’t be happier. It is so very easy and quick and extremely versatile. The taste is also delicious. It has made adding seafood into our diet even easier. Now, I always want my freezer stocked with this Easy Salmon! Once again, thank you Alaska Gold Seafood!!”

“Let me just say that my order was over the top fabulous the fish is amazing, the minced coho
made into salmon burgers was over the moon delicious.”

Easy Salmon Cakes Recipe
Easy Salmon Cakes

“I made my first batch of salmon cakes following the recipe I found on the Alaska Gold website and OMG! I was skeptical at first but I’m truly converted: the minced salmon is amazing with no variation in flavor whatsoever […] [T]he easy salmon is delicious and yes, easy to prepare. It took 30 minutes from preparation to sautéing! Dinner in a snap and tasty too!”

“I recently received my first delivery of Easy Salmon. I couldn’t wait to try the Easy Salmon Cakes recipe shown on the Alaska Gold website. The recipe was easy to follow and came out just like the photo – beautiful! My husband and I were amazed with the texture and fresh taste of the Easy Salmon. Ideas of using the Easy Salmon have been spinning in my head. So I came up with Easy Thai Salmon Meatballs with a red coconut sauce recipe. They came out delicious!.”

“First, I am on a very limited budget, but demand the best from my food. I am thrilled with the Alaska Easy Salmon I ordered last time. It is a versatile way to order the salmon as so many different dishes can be prepared with it. Of course, one can’t go wrong with a traditional salmon patty, but I also like to add some to my morning omelet. Even hubby, who does not like salmon, eats this salmon with gusto. Thanks Alaska Gold!”

 

 

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What do you do with leftover salmon?

leftover salmon

What do you do with leftover salmon?

First, don’t cook or reheat it!

Make a salad or something that doesn’t involve reheating.

This salad inspiration comes from a customer, who writes: “Made with corn salad (mache) and volunteer arugula from the garden, avocado, croutons made from stale homemade wheat bread, and pieces of leftover Alaska Gold coho salmon filets, plus a little orange-infused olive oil, this salad sure was a winner! My husband doesn’t usually get too excited about salads, but he liked this one so much that he grabbed his phone and took a picture of it totally ecstatic.  The combination of flavors surprised him. He’s a recent salmon convert thanks to Alaska Gold, and he’s no photographer, but this salad, made on the fly when we came home from a morning hike, sure is pretty.”

Salads like this one made from leftover coho salmon are also a really great way to maximize macro and micro nutrients in one meal. The perfect mix is a quality sourced protein, like wild salmon, which is rich in Omega-3 fatty acids, and some good fats (an avocado, for example), a bed of nutrient-rich leafy greens, and tons of other veggies and add-ons (some Marcona almonds would also work really well) based on our activity levels and what our bodies are needing.

What’s also great about these salads is that they are easy to prep once you have the leftover salmon. 8 to 10 minutes tops.

A lot of our customers order the bulk sized coho salmon filets, and they grill or bake them for a meal. If there are leftovers, tear up the salmon into pieces, and you can make wonderful salads like these. Put them in some Tupperware and bring them with you in your lunch box, and you’ve got a healthy lunch!

Note: It’s also good to remember to not reheat salmon. In general, this causes the salmon’s natural oils to get rancid. Though leftover salmon works really well for example with scrambled eggs for breakfast, it can go into the pan at the very end of cooking.

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How to cook Alaska Gold wild king salmon and coho salmon

King Salmon Fillet

Wild salmon from the cold, clear waters of Alaska ranks as some of the world’s finest seafood. For extraordinary taste and extraordinary health benefits, eat more wild salmon.

There is no more optimal source of protein than wild salmon. Lean but dense with nutrients at the same time, wild salmon is a perfect protein. Heart-healthy with the right profile of fat, protein and nutrients, wild salmon is loaded with healthy benefits. It’s even good for your hands and skin!

These tips will help you become a salmon pro:

1. Start with excellent quality salmon. The line-caught wild salmon delivered by Alaska Gold Seafood is of the best quality. This quality comes from the catch methods our fishermen use and the handling procedures on their boats. This quality extends all the way to our customers with careful temperature control and our Alaska Gold Customer Service.

2. Our Alaska Gold salmon is delivered to your door frozen on dry ice to maintain temperature control. Remove dry ice. (DO NOT USE BARE HANDS to remove dry ice!)

3. Put salmon in freezer upon receipt. You should receive tracking info via email to know when to expect delivery.

4. The best way to thaw is to put in your refrigerator for 24 hours. Each individually vacuum-sealed salmon portion can be removed from freezer and thawed in your fridge, one at a time, for use whenever you’d like to eat it.

5. After 24-hour thaw in your refrigerator, remove and cut open vacuum-sealed package. Remove salmon portion from package.

6. Rinse and dry the fillet with a paper towel. Let sit out on your counter for a good 20 minutes to let the salmon get to room temperature. (When it’s too cold, the salmon will stick to your grill or pan.)

7. Marinate if desired in a favorite purchased or prepared marinade.

8. Pre-heat the grill if grilling or the pan if sauteing. We have some seafood cooking tips here on how to roast, bake or poach our salmon. Poaching is an excellent method to enjoy our coho salmon. If grilling, we’re big advocates of using a tin foil to make a tent to help retain the salmon’s moisture. Dry salmon is the worst and the best thing you can do is to prevent dryness. Using the “tin foil salmon tent” goes a long way to help retain the salmon’s moisture and natural flavors. Cook for about 10 minutes per inch of fish thickness. Turning is not necessary. Start “checking” the fish after 8 minutes. We like the fish when it starts flaking easily. We encourage you to cook slowly if grilling or baking–250º F is a great temperature, though there are merits to cooking at higher temperatures. We have some wild salmon recipes here.

9. DON’T OVERCOOK!! This is probably the biggest mistake made when cooking seafood. Overcooked fish is dry and unpalatable. When you remove your salmon fillets from the grill, they will continue to cook a little as they sit, so remove them from the grill when they are just nearly done. Salmon is done when it turns a light pink color throughout and feels firm when pressed gently with the back of a fork. Enjoy!

Many of us enjoy our Alaska Gold salmon with the most basic of pairings. Sea salt and a little pepper. I use the dried lavender from my yard, some sea salt and an orange rind to make a lavender sea salt rub, the seasoning that I have most often on my grilled salmon. Other herbs from the garden that pair well with salmon include dill and tarragon. The combination of honey and soy makes a savory sweet combination that goes well with salmon. Lemon and garlic also go well. Take 2 tablespoons butter, 2 teaspoons garlic, the juice from one lemon, a dash of of pepper and two of our coho salmon portions to make a simply delicious meal. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in garlic. Season salmon with pepper and a pinch of salt. Put portions in skin side up for four minutes and then flip and cook for another four minutes. Squeeze some lemon juice onto the salmon. You can substitute olive oil for butter.

How to pick a salmon: There are 5 varieties of commercially available wild Pacific Salmon. Each of these 5 have their virtues. In terms of richness, king salmon (otherwise known as chinook) is king. King salmon are the largest of the five species and are prized for their high oil content and are the salmon frequently featured on upscale restaurant menus. Sockeye salmon is also very flavorful and is known for its distinctive bright red flesh color and complex, robust flavor. Coho salmon (which is frequently called silver salmon) is known for its milder flavor. Families with children enjoy coho salmon but kids like the mild flavor. Coho salmon is best when line-caught like our Alaska Gold salmon. Versatile, coho salmon is a great option to grill or poach. It’s also the perfect salmon with which to make gravlax. If you smoke salmon or cure salmon at home, coho salmon is ideal. Keta salmon is also called chum salmon or dog salmon because it was fed to sled dogs. Though maligned as dog food, when caught in its silver bright color, keta salmon has a mild, nutty flavor, which can be quite pleasant. Pink salmon, which fishermen call “humpies” for the humpback that male pink salmon develop when spawning, is the most populous salmon. It cans and smokes well, which is how you’ll most frequently encounter it. Fish sold as Atlantic salmon, Scottish salmon, or New Zealand salmon is sure to be farmed salmon, as there are no commercially available wild Atlantic salmon in the United States and farmed salmon were introduced to New Zealand. Our Alaska Gold salmon is all wild-caught in the cold, clear waters of Alaska, which has sustainable fishing written into the state constitution. It’s quicker and less expensive to produce a farmed salmon than catching a wild salmon, but quality, in addition to environmental and ethical concerns factor into that lower price. Some people find farmed salmon flabby and off tasting. We find our wild-caught Alaska Gold salmon to have superior flavor, color and a firmer texture. In addition, with state of the art freezing technology, our Alaska Gold salmon can be enjoyed year-round. We recommend storing in your home freezer for no longer than 3 months. Ideally, use the coldest setting on your freezer. Those with dedicated meat/seafood freezers will get longer shelf life on their seafood because opening and shutting the door on your freezer presents slight temperature changes, which are second only to poor boat and dockside handling in terms of reducing quality in seafood.

Every once in a while, customers request a whole salmon. We have thought of offering whole salmon through our website. However, how would we box it in a manner suitable for a home consumer? Each salmon weighs a different amount. It would be difficult to make a consistent size package every time. Also, if we’re feeding a family of 5 to 6, then a whole salmon might make sense. But most people are feeding two to four people at mealtime and usually don’t have the space in their kitchen to “break down” a salmon. Filleting and “breaking down” a salmon is much more difficult than it looks. So we do that all for you. We offer individually vacuum-sealed portion packages. The most popular are our 8-ounce king salmon portions and our 6-ounce coho salmon portions. For those filling their freezers or sharing with friends to buy for a larger group, we offer discounted prices on our bulk salmon offerings. We also offer what we call fillets but most customers will identify as “sides.” These are the whole side of the salmon. These  wild coho salmon sides are ideal for making gravlax and for grilling. Just contact us with any questions on the ideal amount to order.

Our Alaska Gold Easy Salmon Burger Meat be made into burgers, tacos, even a breakfast hash for nutrient-dense, family-friendly meals. Check out the long list of Easy Salmon Recipes made by our customers.

 

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Paul’s Chowder Recipe with Easy Salmon and Halibut

Easy Salmon Chowder
The boat sways too much to get a picture like this, so here’s what the chowder looks like in a studio setting.

Dear Alaska Gold Customer,

Many of you we’ve never spoken a word to. With others, you call in, tell us about your families, your dinners, your recipes, your pets, your favorite musicians, the weather where you live, and many other things. We know some of you pretty well. To some of you, we’re like the local fish monger, who you go chat with while buying fish although, in most cases, we’re far away.

Megan and I will even occasionally have customers on the phone ask us if we’re fishermen, too. The short answer is no. We’re too busy fielding calls, answering emails, making sure fish gets to the right place. We work for the fishermen.

However, I spent some time this summer on a trolling boat with one of our fishermen/owners, Carter Hughes, who fishes on the 36-foot F/V Astrolabe. I did my best as a deckhand, learning the tricks of the trade, seeing the fishing life up close and personal. It’s a lot harder than it looks.

Over the next few months, I’ll share some stories from my journal that details my days out trolling for salmon.

Today, since there’s snow on the ground, I wanted to share a story from my journal about a delicious chowder I had out to sea that warmed my heart. Paul’s Chowder.

July 24th

We pass Cape Amelia and Sea Lion Rocks, watching sea lions hauling out on the prehistoric-looking coast.

Baranof Island is 90 miles long and Kruzof maybe 25 miles. Kruzof looks so tiny on a map, but it takes hours to make our way to Salisbury Sound, which separates Kruzof from Chichagof Island.

Chichagof and Baranof are two of the ABC islands (Admiralty being the third) the most densely populated areas for coastal brown bears on the planet. Kruzof, though smaller and uninhabited–a few logging roads and forest service cabins here and there—also has plenty of brown bear. It’s a wild coast where the rare Alaskan surfer or hunter might tread a path through the dense wilderness in pursuit of adventure.

“It looks small on a map because Alaska is so huge,” Carter nudges me into an epiphany that repeats itself every time I’m up in the 49th state. Big Country.

By 1:30, we can see the Khaz Peninsula in sight of a cove in which Carter is planning to anchor.

At the helm of a salmon fishing boat
Carter at the helm

A little before 6, Carter aims the auto-pilot to tack toward the tiny islands surrounding the Khaz Peninsula and Khaz Head, an imposing peak that looks down at us. We continue trolling while Carter cooks dinner, a halibut/salmon chowder, the recipe for which came from Paul Olson, who fishes on the F/V Pacific Flyer, and is an environmental lawyer when he’s not out trolling. In our co-op, fishermen bring a whole range of backgrounds—there are lots of schoolteachers, a few former investment bankers, even a retired astronaut. Carpenters, chemists, poets, lifers (those who represent multiple generations in the fishing business). We have a few fishermen/owners who hail from New York City who gave up that fast-paced life of riches for the rich life of Sitka Sound. A few decades ago, a Swiss banker turned author and his world-touring concert pianist spouse made their way to Sitka to live this unique lifestyle, too–their children continue the fishing tradition.

Looking out at Slocum Arm and Khaz Peak on Chichagof Island.

Fishing is still one of those last refuges where you can be about as close as possible, at least in 2017, to a free and wild existence that truly demands just about everything. Those who seek it out are truly hardy souls, but they’re rewarded with the sights of some beautiful country and working in a profession that means something at the end of the day. We feed people. Which is sacred.

We pull the gear before 8. Fairly slow fishing with no feed in the water that we can see. We were struggling to get out of a dead zone that seemed to be following us. We felt better once we stopped, knowing that tomorrow would be another day.

I’ve been blessed with good weather on this trip, but a slight drizzle mixed with the wind chills my bones.

Paul’s chowder is the perfect tonic to warm me up and I wolf it down. Carter shows me his journal where he had scrawled the recipe.

 

Ingredients:

Halibut (one 8-oz portion)

Bacon (two or three strips)

Easy Salmon—one 1-pound package (Our Easy Salmon can be used in combination or in lieu of the bacon)

1/2 onion, diced

4-6 red potatoes, diced

2 Carrots, diced

4 cups Chicken broth

1 cup cream (milk or half & half will be too thin)

1 Celery stock, diced

Fresh Tarragon

Thyme

Dill

Black Pepper

Instructions:

Cook bacon pieces separately. Heat 1 to 2 cups chicken broth. At same time saute veggies in olive oil. Add bacon to chicken broth and mix in some thyme, tarragon and dill. When veggies are 2/3 done, add to chicken broth and spike again with chopped seasonings. When veggies are fully cooked spike again with chopped seasonings and add Easy Salmon and halibut. When fish is cooked add cream and simmer for 15 minutes (don’t boil cream!).

Carter is quite a cook and I look forward to sharing more galley recipes and fishing stories from the F/V Astrolabe over the next few months.

Stay warm and stay in touch,

KendallSeafood Chowder Recipe

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Learn how coho salmon fights the winter blues

With the colder, darker season coming upon us, we have some important news on Wild Salmon and vitamin D content:

Just one of our 6-ounce wild coho salmon portions has over 90% of the recommended daily value of vitamin D.

A wise fisherman once said, “You don’t grow old eating Alaska Gold.” While we don’t claim to have the fountain of youth, we believe that the vitamin D and other nutrients in wild coho salmon are what keep those of us up north strong through the winter.  The nutrients in seafood are many and it’s no wonder our fishermen are so full of life, even after working 16-hour days.

A lot of Alaskans say that the indigenous peoples of southeast Alaska, like the Tlingits, were able to not only survive but thrive during the dark and dreary days in the region by eating loads of fish throughout the winter. Numerous varieties of seafood, and in particular salmon, were essential to the early Americans’ diets. Food is a central part of the Tlingit culture—the rich land and waters of southeast Alaska the provider. Because of the rich bounties from the land and sea, the Tlingits were one of the richest societies in human history—both rich in nourishing food and rich in arts and culture, because the nourishing food they were able to hunt, fish and gather gave them time to develop rich storytelling and artistic traditions.

Don’t take it from us—we’re just fishermen. In the blog post here, we offer some links to studies and articles on the health benefits of vitamin D.

Get hooked on our Alaska Gold wild salmon to give you strength through the winter. Our coho salmon portions in boxes of 6, 14 and 28 are on sale for 15% off through October 31st when you use the following coupon code: GoldCoho17

Or, 10% off our larger (already) discounted portions boxes and coho salmon fillets using the following coupon code: GoldCoho17DISCOUNT

Get some now. Offer expires October 31st, 2017 or while supplies last.

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Get Our Alaska Gold Coho Salmon and Live the Dream

Trolling Boat fishing for salmon in southeast Alaska.
Trolling for salmon in southeast Alaska. Photo by Berett Wilber

For our fishermen in southeast Alaska, there is something special about coho salmon. More than any fish we catch coho salmon is arguably the heart and soul of our region and our fishermen-owned co-op. Each summer coho salmon return to the thousands of tiny creeks that stream through the ancient trees of the Tongass Rain Forest. You can watch them jump up waterfalls, giving it their all, with the aim of returning to a little pool to spawn. Through October, our fishermen work sixteen to eighteen-hour days to catch each fish One Hook One Fish At A Time, then dress and ice each salmon to keep them in perfect condition until they reach our customers.

There’s nothing quite like what fishermen call “the coho grind.”

This beautiful story, “Living the Dream,” written by one of our fishermen’s daughters about her first summer deckhanding on her dad’s boat, includes some spellbinding photos of life on the water in southeast Alaska. Living the Dream is what she calls it. And a number of us all call our lives “Living the Dream.”

You can live the dream, too.

Get our coho salmon portions in boxes of 6, 14 or 28 portions.

Get our Already Discounted Bulk Coho Salmon portions and coho salmon fillets.

In a few days, we’ll have some info on the nutrient dense wonder that is coho salmon. Here’s a sneak preview: Our wild coho salmon is loaded with life-giving nutrients!

 

Wild Coho Salmon
Coho salmon side and portions. Side is on top and portions are below.

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The Salmon Forest

 

Wild salmon returning to spawn
Salmon vigorously returning to their birthplace to spawn. These are pinks returning to Indian River which runs right through Sitka.

During late summer and early fall in Southeast Alaska, rivers are full of salmon returning to spawn. And these wild salmon are precisely the reason behind all of the other life that comes out to play during the Alaskan summer. Amy Gulick, in Salmon in the Trees, notes that 137 species in the Tongass Rain Forest of Southeast Alaska depend on wild salmon. Particularly dependent on the Tongass are the wild coho salmon that run up the thousands of small creeks that stream through virgin old growth forest.

wild coho salmon
Thousands of wild coho salmon run up this creek at the end of summer to reach spawning grounds

Wild salmon are the fertilizer upon which an entire forest grows. As a keystone species in the Tongass Rainforest in Southeast Alaska, wild salmon bring marine nutrients inland and provide an important food resource for a variety of animals. These nutrients also increase the productivity of nearby plants and forests. Mammals from mice to grizzly bears feast on spawning salmon. So do bald eagles and ravens, as do many other birds. Birds and mammals fly off with or drag carcasses into surrounding forests, bringing marine-derived nutrients for the forests around salmon-bearing streams. Up to 70% of the nitrogen intake for plants and trees in the Tongass Rain Forest can be traced back to wild salmon. The trees in the forest grow, provide shade, cooling the water, making it the ideal temperature for the salmon to spawn. This full circle relationship also involves Southeast Alaskan fishermen.

Fishermen’s ways of life depend on healthy salmon runs, which also depend on these forests and the healthy watersheds that are part of forests. Our fishermen live within a “Blue Economy.” Their livelihoods depend on the ocean, which in turn depends on the forest. Salmon fishermen are some of the first to advocate for the health of the oceans and forests. They advocate for forests because the salmon need them for survival. Fishermen do not want the health of the forests disproportionately ceded to mining or logging interests, which can have long-term detrimental effects on the forests and hence the salmon runs.

It might sound counter-intuitive, but in essence protecting wild salmon by buying wild salmon from fishermen who fish in well-managed fisheries is one of the best ways to support wild salmon and the habitats in which wild salmon dwell. It’s easy to say not eating wild salmon would be better to save them, but then who would advocate for the wild salmon and these places?

Market-based solutions can be the most effective solutions to solving the problems of feeding people in an environmentally-friendly way because they bring solutions that have benefits that are sustainable both in an ecological and an economic sense. Working in partnership with other interest groups, protecting wild salmon can be good for all parties. Fisheries are the top economic driver in the Tongass National Forest. With 25-percent of the entire West Coast’s entire salmon harvest coming from the Tongass, that’s important work that fishermen do. And wild salmon, when habitats are protected and fisheries managed according to the science-first principles used by Alaska Fish and Game, can be a renewable resource from now into perpetuity.

southeast Alaska
Small islands through which salmon run in southeast Alaska.

Last November, the McDowell Group, a  market research firm with a socio-economic focus, released an economic study commissioned by the advocacy group Salmon Beyond Borders, a group of concerned fishermen in alliance with Native American and First Nations tribes from coastal southeast Alaska communities. The study considers the economic value of commercial fishing and tourism, two of the region’s key industries that depend significantly on the health of Alaskan rivers. The study found that the Taku, Stikine, and Unuk rivers generate an annual 48 million dollars in economic activity for Southeast Alaska. When considering a 30-year horizon, these watersheds are valued at just under 1 billion dollars. This economic value can in theory be generated in perpetuity through careful management of sustainable fishing. In addition, tourists come to see these last wild, pristine places in person.  

Fish, wildlife, and scenic resources are fully renewable. They also have the potential to offer greater economic value as similar resources and experiences grow more scarce. The bounty from these rivers provides thousands of jobs that contribute to the well-being of Southeast Alaskan coastal communities. And the fishermen and others who work in contact with salmon and forests take a deep interest into conserving these places for future generations. Supporting fishermen that fish using sustainable methods by buying Alaska seafood direct from a fishermen-owned co-op at Alaska Gold Seafood is part of sustaining the salmon forest.

Looking off the bow at virgin forest on the Khaz Peninsula, southeast Alaska.

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Easy Work Lunch: Mason Jar Canned Salmon Salad Recipe

Mason Jar Canned Salmon Salad Recipe“Real food in a package that fits your life.”

It’s difficult to eat healthy, nutritious meals when you’re on the go and getting the kids ready for school. Here’s an easy-to-pack, nourishing desk lunch.

The beautiful colors of this salad not only pop out and provide delightful eye candy , but the broad range of colors also mean  a variety of nutrients. The addition of our Southeast Alaska Line-Caught Wild Ivory King Salmon provides a healthy dose of Omega-3 fatty acids, lean protein, B vitamins, and vitamin D. Because of this powerful punch, our wild salmon is known to support heart and brain health.

The canned salmon is already cooked and you can prepare the quinoa and potatoes all at once on Sunday night for easy assembly of your salmon salads later in the week. The salad also includes cherry tomatoes, greens and cheddar cheese for a full cornucopia of flavor and nourishing ingredients. Using a mason jar makes it easy to transport this healthy, nutrient-packed salad to work without it getting soggy. The strategic layering will keep all the ingredients  fresh and crisp.

 

 

Ingredients

Dressing:

1⁄2 cup olive oil

2 tablespoons golden balsamic vinegar

1 teaspoon sugar

juice from 1/2 a lime

1 teaspoon Montreal Steak Seasoning

1 pinch sea salt

Salad:

9  small medley potatoes (pick a variety of purple, Yukon Gold, and red potatoes)

16 cherry tomatoes (sliced into fourths)

1 cup organic cheddar cheese

1 cup cooked quinoa

2 cans Alaska Gold Canned Wild Ivory King Salmon (6oz each)

2 tablespoons avocado mayo (or sub your favorite mayo or greek yogurt)

2  sweet peppers (diced)

5 ounces greens (spinach/baby butter lettuce/rainbow chard)

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.

Slice potatoes into fourths, lengthwise… then place them in a large mixing bowl.

Add 1 tsp olive oil and 1 tsp lemon juice, then stir to coat the potatoes evenly.

On a foil lined cookie sheet, lay the potatoes in a single layer. Bake for 20 minutes… until golden brown and crispy on the outside.

Meanwhile, combine all of the dressing ingredients in a small jar (olive oil, balsamic, sugar, lime juice, Montreal steak seasoning, and sea salt). Use a whisk to mix it.

In a small bowl, flake the canned salmon with a fork, then stir in the avocado mayo and diced peppers. Set aside.

To assemble jars

Make sure to pack the mason jars in the specific order described to keep the salad from getting soggy. First comes the dressing. Divide it evenly between the four jars (approximately 2 tbsp per mason jar). Then top with a handful of roasted potatoes. Then add 1/4 cup quinoa to each jar. Then, add about 1/4 cup of the salmon mixture, flattening it in the jar with the backside of a spoon. Then add 1/4 cup cheese to each jar. Then add 1/4 of the sliced tomatoes. Then, add a handful of greens all the way to the top of each jar. You can press them down a bit and add a little more. You want the jars to be completely full so that there’s no movement. Then, top with the mason jar lids.

Keep refrigerated. Bring to work with you in an insulated bag, being mindful to keep the jars upright during travel.

When you’re ready to eat, pour into a large salad bowl. Stir, then devour!

(The mason jar salads will keep in the fridge for 3 -4 days).

Yields four 20-oz wide-mouth mason jars.

Recipe comes from Nosh and Nourish.

Deconstructed Mason Jar Salad Nosh and Nourish. Photo from Nosh and Nourish.